OpEd: Young Adult Lit and the Classroom

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A few years back I was asked by a dear friend if I teach the classics and I answered with an emphatic “No!” He scrunched up his face, tilted his head to the side and replied “Why not?” I sighed and then prepared myself for explaining why I feel like some of the writings of [….]

Kirkus Prize Shortlists Announced

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Founded in 1933, Kirkus has been “an authoritative voice in book discovery” for over 80 years.  The associated  Kirkus Reviews magazine gives industry professionals a sneak peek at the most notable books prior to their publication, and releases book reviews to consumers on a weekly basis.  The Kirkus Star icon affixed to selected reviews signifies [….]

LitStack Recs: Stoner & Speak Easy

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Stoner, by John Williams John Williams’ 1965 novel went out of print after selling only 2,000 copies, but since its re-release by Vintage in 1995, this novel of a Midwestern academic’s insular life has appeared on bestseller lists in Europe and Israel and sold over 100,000 copies. Stoner seems at first an unlikely candidate for [….]

LitStaff Pick: Our Favorite Historical Novels

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There’s something about settings of the past that just grabs us. We love the escapist notion of absolutely disappearing into a world unfamiliar and uncertain to us. Historical fiction does that and sometimes, when we are so lost in the mines of the mountains, in the exotic tragedies of 16th century Asia, our imaginations are [….]

Best Literary Bromances (LINK)

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We love this piece from The Huffington Post on some of the best literary bromances. From Potter and Weasley to Hamlet and Horatio, these best buds of literature reflect the relationships that have been around for ages: The concept of a ‘bromance,’ however, is not revelatory or new. They’ve been occurring for ages (see: Homer). [….]

Reading Literature Makes Us Smarter and Nicer

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The folks over at Time Ideas published an interesting piece on how literature impacts us all. From the piece: Gregory Currie, a professor of philosophy at the University of Nottingham, recently argued in the New York Times that we ought not to claim that literature improves us as people, because there is no “compelling evidence that suggests that [….]

LitStaff Pick: Lessons Learned From Our Favorite Teachers

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This is the week designated to celebrate that most noble (and frustrating) of careers: Teaching. It takes a special person to tackle education. There is little appreciation and even less monetary reward in the task, but it is not taken on for either, I suspect. I was lucky enough, in graduate school, to befriend a [….]

Hugo Winner Jo Walton Explains Why She Reads

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In her Tor.com piece, Hugo winner Jo Walton talks about purposeful reading: In the comments to my post “Is There a Right Age to Read a Book,” I noticed an odd thing. I’d written it mostly thinking about the comment that you shouldn’t read Jane Eyre until you’re thirty or Middlemarch until you’re forty, and [….]

Thoughts from the Editor: Shabby Chic Writing

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You may not know it, but one of my many obsessions is home decorating. I stalk blogs, I learn and I apply that small bit of knowledge to doing my best to improve our little place. It’s addictive. Very. Being a good little Southern girl in my, well, thirtysomethings, I’ve discovered that my tastes and [….]