LitStack Recs: Sense and Sensibility Screenplay and Diaries & Brotherhood of the Wheel

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The Sense and Sensibility Screenplay and Diaries, by Emma Thompson There’s enough left of summer to fit in at least one more light read, and Emma Thompson’s diary of the making of the award-winning Sense and Sensibility is a perfect choice. The 1995 film, directed by Ang Lee, would garner seven nominations at the 68th [….]

LitStack Rec: Vivian Maier: Street Photographer & Private Diary of Mr. Darcy

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Vivian Maier: Street Photographer by Vivian Maier (Author), John Maloof (Editor), Geoff Dyer (Contributor) For forty years, Vivian Maier worked as a nanny in Chicago and took photographs on her days off. That may not seem extraordinary, but her work is quickly proving to be our era’s preeminent artistic discovery—the kind that comes along once [….]

LitStack Review: Longbourn by Jo Baker

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Longbourn Jo Baker Alfred A. Knopf Publication Date:  October 8, 2013 ISBN 978-0-385-35123-2 The promotional tagline for Jo Baker’s new historical fiction novel is “Pride and Prejudice is only half the story.”  I would put forward that Pride and Prejudice is merely the polished flooring that this marvelously realized story dances upon. As many Janeites* [….]

Jane Austen’s Ring Stays in UK

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From USA Today: It is a truth universally acknowledged that an antique ring once owned by Jane Austen would have to stay in the U.K., even if purchased by an American pop star. Austen worshipers in Britain are celebrating today at news that the Jane Austen’s House Museum has raised enough money to keep Austen’s [….]

England REALLY Doesn’t Want Kelly Clarkson to Have Austen’s Ring

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File this one under “Really? I mean, really?” From the Huffington Post: LONDON — A Jane Austen museum said Monday it has received 100,000 pounds ($155,000) from an anonymous benefactor to help it buy the writer’s ring back from singer Kelly Clarkson. Earlier this month, the British government placed a temporary export ban on the [….]

LitStaff Pick: Our Favorite Fictional Mothers

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Generally, I think, many of us will say that our mothers are the best ever. We’re all biased, of course, and what we learned from the mothers in our lives impacts us in ways that we won’t fully comprehend until we’re older. For most of my life, I honestly believed I was nothing like my [….]

Featured Author Review: Without a Summer by Mary Robinette Kowal

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Without A Summer Mary Robinette Kowal Tor Books 1st Edition: April 2, 2013 ISBN 978-0-7653-3415-2 —♦— Let me say this:  I utterly enjoyed Mary Robinette Kowal’s second novel in her Glamourist Histories series, Glamour in Glass, with its early 1800s historical intrigue and cultural exploratives, but after the initial Shades of Milk and Honey, I [….]

LitStack’s Featured Author Review: Glamour in Glass by Mary Robinette Kowal

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Glamour in Glass Mary Robinette Kowal First Edition: April 2012 Tor Books ISBN 978-0-7653-2561-7 —♦— In Glamour in Glass, author Mary Robinette Kowal takes the main characters from her delightful Regency novel Shades of Milk and Honey and, with Jane Austen still as her patron saint, leads them into uncharted Austen territory:  married life. Yes, [….]

LitStack Featured Author Review: Shades of Milk and Honey by Mary Robinette Kowal

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We are thrilled to feature Mary Robinette Kowal as our March Featured Author.  A Hugo-award winner, Kowal is a novelist and professional puppeteer. Her debut novel Shades of Milk and Honey (Tor 2010) was nominated for the 2010 Nebula Award for Best Novel. In 2008 she won the Campbell Award for Best New Writer, while two of [….]

Literary Board Games

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Flavorwire discovered the cure for the frigid winter temperatures when you’ve finished a great book and still aren’t keen to go outside: Literary Board Games. When it’s cold outside, book nerds tend to hibernate with their novels. But what about a bookish activity that’s also social (and indoors)? This week, the Paris Review pointed us [….]