18 October, 2021

5 Great Monologues in Literature

Granger
Fahreheit 451fahrenheit 451
Ray Bradbury

[…] live as if you’d drop dead in ten seconds. See the world. It’s more fantastic than any dream made or paid for in factories. Ask no guarantees, ask for no security, there never was such an animal. And if there were, it would be related to the great sloth which hangs upside down in a tree all day every day, sleeping its life away. To hell with that,” he said, “shake the tree and knock the great sloth down on his ass.”

2 thoughts on “5 Great Monologues in Literature

  1. Nice choices, Tee! My favorite monologue (and I know this is cheating because it’s a play instead of narrative) is from Peter Schafer’s “Equus”, about a young boy under the care of a jaded psychologist because he has blinded a herd of horses. It’s an extremely powerful play. But in this monologue, the doctor questions his ability to help the boy, with an extremely personal insight. It reminds me that all is not as it seems and that the “norm” may not be “normal” at all: ” ‘Oh, the primitive world,’ I say. ‘What instinctual truths were lost with it!’ And while I sit there, baiting a poor unimaginative woman with the word, that freaky boy tries to conjure the reality! I sit looking at pages of centaurs trampling the soil of Argos—and outside my window he is trying to become one, in a Hampshire field! . . . I watch that woman knitting, night after night—a woman I haven’t kissed in six years—and he stands in the dark for an hour, sucking the sweat off his God’s hairy cheek! “

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