Fantasy Books We’d Loved to See on Film

Black Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse

What’s it about?

The first book in the Between Earth and Sky trilogy, inspired by the civilizations of the Pre-Columbian Americas and woven into a tale of celestial prophecies, political intrigue, and forbidden magic.

A god will return
When the earth and sky converge
Under the black sun

In the holy city of Tova, the winter solstice is usually a time for celebration and renewal, but this year it coincides with a solar eclipse, a rare celestial event proscribed by the Sun Priest as an unbalancing of the world.

Meanwhile, a ship launches from a distant city bound for Tova and set to arrive on the solstice. The captain of the ship, Xiala, is a disgraced Teek whose song can calm the waters around her as easily as it can warp a man’s mind. Her ship carries one passenger. Described as harmless, the passenger, Serapio, is a young man, blind, scarred, and cloaked in destiny. As Xiala well knows, when a man is described as harmless, he usually ends up being a villain.

Why would it look good on film?

Simply put, there just isn’t anything on bookshelves like Black Sun. This isn’t your mama’s fantasy. This is a Pre-Columbian beauty that tells a story, a millennia in the making. There is such a unique and beautiful magic to the world-building in this story and such wonderful individualism, viewers would be hard-pressed to find its equal. The potential for visual impact is limitless. Someone get this on the screen immediately!

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