Our Favorite Film Adaptations

Published on :

We’ve all heard it before: “Books are always better than the films they’re based on.” The book vs film debate is likely never to be resolved. From the British Vivien Leigh taking on the role of the very southern Scarlett O’Hara to Will Smith portraying a completely different version of Robert Neville in I Am [….]

Our Favorite Shakespearean Quotes

Published on :

Despite the controversy surrounding his authorship and even the rumors spread about his life, Shakespeare is still an artist whose works, whose life, spans the centuries. As Ben Jonson wrote, Shakespeare “was not of an age, but for all time.”  That his sonnets and plays have stretched beyond his generation and still reaches the young and [….]

Book Endings We’d Like to Change

Published on :

It’s happened to you before. You’re invested in a great book, in the flux and flow of a twisting plot, of multidimensional characters that make you mad, make you cry, maybe even make you scream out loud. Then, after all the hours you’ve invested in the book, all the possibilities, the hopes, the resolutions that [….]

The Writers We Lost Too Soon

Published on :

Death and taxes, as the old cliche goes. Both are unavoidable, and while we won’t give you our political opinions on paying taxes, we will say that it’s never easy or expected when we lose someone we love. Even if that “someone” is known to us from afar, from the words we read in their [….]

Our Favorite Timeless Plots

Published on :

  There are seven stories in the world.   It’s a well used maxim and not necessarily true. (Kipling, for example, claimed there were sixty-nine stories in the world). But the truth remains that various plots have been invented and reinvented since the beginning of the press. Some have been re-imagined so often that they [….]

The Least Predictable Books We’ve Read

Published on :

Sometimes, it isn’t all that difficult to sort out what will happen in a novel. It does, of course, depend solely on “who” you’re reading and, perhaps, your personal ability to pick up hints, to notice what has been foreshadowed. But sometimes, when the plot is thick and the author is clever, smarties among the [….]

LitStack Recs: The Oysters of Locmariaquer & Relics

Published on :

The Oysters of Locmariaquer, by Eleanor Clark Late in Eleanor Clark’s extraordinary book, she tells us the oyster needs the same landscape that a plein air painter does: a certain air, light, chemistry. “The explanation,” she writes, “might be quite simple, not esoteric at all—in some common equation of factors and atmospheres.” Only a writer [….]

LitStack Recs: Manhood for Amateurs & Low Town

Published on :

Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son, essays by Michael Chabon The trope of fatherly wisdom, borne of experience and dispensed with measured calm, is a wonderful thing, but how realistic it? There are memoirs about fathers such as Alysia Abbott’s Fairyland and Will Boast’s Epilogue, in which fathers [….]

LitStack Recs: Nora Webster & Santa 17

Published on :

Nora Webster by Colm Tóibín At the heart of Colm Tóibín‘s new novel is the story of a woman, a story, he says, he’d been circling around for years. It’s there, in his novels and stories (eight novels and a collection) as a metaphor, an idea at the perimeter. That novel, Nora Webster, just released, centers [….]

LitStaff Rec: Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures & Alif the Unseen

Published on :

 Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures by Emma Straub Readers captivated by Old Hollywood are sure to love Emma Straub’s debut novel, Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures. The novel, Straub’s first, portrays an era when the veil of glamor was not so easily pulled away, and is an appealing behind-the-curtain view of the transformation from mere [….]