A Few Thoughts on Banned Books Week

Published on :

This is Banned Books Week, and we here at Litstack applaud all the buzz that it’s gotten on social media. The very idea of banning books is the antithesis to an educated and progressive society, and yet some of our most cherished classics have been subject to challenge:  The Grapes of Wrath, To Kill a [….]

Five Surprisingly Banned Books

Published on :

As book lovers, we don’t really understand the purpose of censorship. We certainly don’t support an effort to ban any books because we believe that readers should be able to judge for themselves the appropriateness of a given book. But sometimes, even the best books are pulled from the shelves. Some of the following were [….]

The American Library Association’s Top Ten Frequently Challenged Books of 2014

Published on :

Each year, the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom compiles a list of the top ten most frequently challenged books in order to inform the public about censorship in libraries and schools. The ALA actively condemns censorship and works to ensure free access to information, which is certainly something to celebrate during Banned Books [….]

Mug Shots Of Characters From Banned Books

Published on :

We love this post from THP: University student Kate Boryeskne created a compelling response to censorship with a series of paintings she’s calling “Banned Books Mugshots.” The illustrations feature characters from challenged books such as “The Scarlet Letter” and “Their Eyes Were Watching God.” Check out more of Kate’s illustrations on her portfolio. [h/t Flavorwire]   Source

Banned Book Review: Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?

Published on :

  Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin. Illustrated by Eric Carle. In February of 2010, the Texas Education Board made one of the more embarrassing blunders in the annuals of book banning. In their eagerness to protect their constituency from an obscure Marxist theorist, they mistakenly banned a children’s picture [….]

Banned Book Review: ‘Fahrenheit 451’ by Ray Bradbury

Published on :

“It was a pleasure to burn. It was a special pleasure to see things eaten, to see things blackened and changed….and his hands were the hands of some amazing conductor playing all the symphonies of blazing and burning to bring down the tatters and charcoal ruins of history.” These words are our first introduction to [….]

“Sweet Children” and Trust

Published on :

I remember when I first received my first Harlequin book. I was 13 years old. I don’t remember anything about the book other than it’s olive green cover, but what I do remember is the reason why my mother gave me the book and the feeling has stayed with me since. We were leaving our [….]

Banned Book Review: Coraline by Neil Gaiman

Published on :

Coraline Neil Gaiman Harper Entertainment ISBN-10: 0061649694 My first encounter with Coraline was with the movie, an unusual occurrence for me — usually the reverse is true. I thought it was atmospheric, quirky, a teensy-bit scary (even for me, a-totally-fully-grown-and-not-at-all-afraid-of-disembodied-hands adult), and creative. Then, of course, I had to read the Neil Gaiman’s book. Which [….]

Banned Book Week Sept. 30 – Oct. 6

Published on :

Banned Books Week is the national book community’s annual celebration of the freedom to read. Hundreds of libraries and bookstores around the country draw attention to the problem of censorship by mounting displays of challenged books and hosting a variety of events. The 2012 celebration of Banned Books Week will be held from September 30 [….]