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Weirdo Writers: Peculiar Habits of Famous Writers
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Weirdo Writers: Peculiar Habits of Famous Writers

Writers are a strange breed. No worries, we count ourselves in that group, but let’s face it, it’s those little idiosyncrasies that probably enable writers to paint pictures with words and imagine remarkably impossible worlds. The writers below are among the greats, and if their strange habits are any indication of their genius, then we […]

Writers are a strange breed. No worries, we count ourselves in that group, but let’s face it, it’s those little idiosyncrasies that probably enable writers to paint pictures with words and imagine remarkably impossible worlds. The writers below are among the greats, and if their strange habits are any indication of their genius, then we are grateful for their odd quirks. How about you, LitStackers? What weird writing habits do you have? We want to hear from you.

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5 responses to “Weirdo Writers: Peculiar Habits of Famous Writers”

  1. janridernew@gmail.com' Jan Rider Newman says:

    Well, where's my Sherwood Anderson? I'm a great listener. Faulkner didn't say when he did his own writing. I'm beginning to think I need to go back to writing longhand, that the computer is interfering with my creative process. Maybe that isn't true for those who become writers by composing on a PC or Mac. Being from the dark ages, I wonder whether writing suffers from the transition of pen to keyboard, at least in the first draft. Longhand requires such patience, such attention to the work, to each word and bit of punctuation. I'm not sure a writer gets–gives?–those qualities to a computer draft. But write horizontally? Too uncomfortable. I loved almost everything of Truman Capote's. He once said he'd never been rejected: "They took everything." That was a hateful thing to say, TC. 🙂

  2. sandybritchesomine@gmail.com' Jenny_O says:

    For a long while, I was unable to set anything down on paper. Just couldn't do it. What nudged me out of that was sitting in a dark room, in front of a computer screen. I just typed anything and everything, and got a lot done. Now, I've found that the computer screen is my biggest enermy and have since returned to writing longhand. I think that different things work at different points in your life

  3. tee.tate@gmail.com' Tee says:

    @Jan, I agree with you! Capote was a shameless bragger!

  4. tee.tate@gmail.com' Tee says:

    @Jenny, I think you can have a happy medium. When I'm blocked, I take to the notebook and my Sharpie pen. Really helps to make you think before you write. Love it!

  5. jenmessner@gmail.com' Jennifer says:

    @Jenny, Jan, Tee – I heard author Meir Shalev speak last year – he often turns the computer monitor/screen off while writing. As one who tends to get distracted by editing while writing, that would either be incredibly helpful or drive me crazy. Have yet to try it out.

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