LitStack

for the love of all things wordy

Home /
LitStaff Picks: The Books We Hated As Kids but Love as Adults
;

LitStaff Picks: The Books We Hated As Kids but Love as Adults

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens When I was in 9th grade, my English class was assigned to read Charles Dicken’s Great Expectations. I opened the book and was immediately put off by the bleak setting and rough characters. Each night I’d sit at the kitchen table and plow through the assigned pages, groaning audibly as […]

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

When I was in 9th grade, my English class was assigned to read Charles Dicken’s Great Expectations. I opened the book and was immediately put off by the bleak setting and rough characters. Each night I’d sit at the kitchen table and plow through the assigned pages, groaning audibly as things went from bad
to worse for young Pip. Somewhere between Pip’s theft of his sister’s pies, and his torturous visits with Miss Havisham and Estella, I lost my bearings. At fifteen, I was nowhere near ready to comprehend the endless list of characters, or the complex plot changes. Needless to say, I did not do well on the unit’s exam.

Years later though, having gained experience and a small amount of wisdom, I had the pleasure of revisiting the book and enjoyed it immensely. Once I was able to keep the characters straight, I was able to appreciate them, and consider them to be some of the best ever created.

Lisa Emig

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5

3 responses to “LitStaff Picks: The Books We Hated As Kids but Love as Adults”

  1. jenmessner@gmail.com' Jennifer says:

    Ha! great picks everyone!

  2. edenstreet@gmail.com' J.A. Pak says:

    I've always loved Persuasion (not a fan of Emma, which I find dull). Persuasion, for me, is Pride & Prejudice written by a much more mature writer, both in understanding and skill.

  3. JMS says:

    What a great idea…really made me think. And, it reminded me of something I learned as an English teacher…you really aren't often prepared to evaluate or discuss a piece until you've read it twice. Second time usually gives perspective. Loved the Hemingway assessment…thanks Mr. Spokony!

Leave a Reply