for the love of all things wordy


Gimbling in the Wabe – Making Sausage

In last week’s 2nd Annual NerdCon: Stories convention, held at the Minneapolis Convention Center, I attended a panel discussion entitled “Sotto Voce:  Finding Your Voice”.  Many of the panelists talked about staying true to yourself, searching for your true voice, and the difficulty that sometimes arises when you find yourself defaulting to a voice that […]


LitStack Rec: The Good Soldier and Planetfall

The Good Soldier, by Ford Madox Ford If this novel had been published under the title the author selected, The Saddest Story, contemporary readers would likely have had a difficult time locating a copy. But fortunately, Ford Madox Ford agreed to his publisher’s suggestion of The Good Soldier, and with that organizing idea the novel […]


My Report from NerdCon: Stories, Part One

It was my distinct pleasure to be able to attend the 2nd Annual NerdCon: Stories convention last weekend at the Minneapolis Convention Center.  The brainchild of Vlogbrother Hank Green and author Patrick Rothfuss, the two day conference featured over 60 special guests including authors, actors, artists, narrators, podcasters, puppeteers, librarians, comedians, directors, screenwriters, game designers, […]


Bob Dylan Wins the Nobel Prize for Literature

For the first time in its 115 year history, the Nobel Prize for Literature was awarded to a songwriter/musician:  Minnesota native Bob Dylan.  He is the first American to win the award since author Toni Morrison won it in 1993. In awarding the Prize, the Swedish Academy cited his “having created new poetic expressions within […]


LitStack Rec: Spielberg, Truffaut and Me & Feed

Spielberg, Truffaut and Me: An Actor’s Diary, by Bob Balaban In the summer of 1976, during the first weeks of the filming of Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Francois Truffaut, who played the extraterrestrial specialist Claude Lacombe, was at work on a book about actors—tentatively titled Hurry Up and Wait. The legendary auteur-director and […]


The Firefox Book, by Elliot Wigginton (editor)

A perfect book for #throwbackthursday, this compendium of customs and rural living practices was published in 1972, and was in its time hugely influential. The local tradition and lore documented in The Foxfire Book comes firsthand from longtime residents of Southern Appalachia. At the height of this book’s notoriety, copies could be found nearly everywhere, and for certain readers, the word foxfire (a term for Georgia’s phosphorescent lichen) might still conjure the volume’s distinctive Courier type, its sepia-toned layout, and the tooth of the cover’s heavy stock.

Subtitled Hog Dressing, Log Cabin Building, Mountain Crafts and Foods, Planting by the Signs, Snake Lore, Hunting Tales, Faith Healing, Moonshining, and Other Affairs of Plain Living, the book was the brainchild of Elliot Wigginton, an English teacher who first envisioned a community oral history project as means to render the curriculum more relevant for his high school students. The students set about recording taped interviews and taking black and white photographs, gathering what has become an unmatched collection of methods and means of rural homesteading.

Traditional Appalachian Beekeeping, from Foxfire, Volume 2.

The material was originally collected in 1966, in a magazine series simply titled Foxfire, and four years later, when demand exceeded supply, the content was collected in anthology form. Soon after its release, The Foxfire Book reached national prominence to become a best-seller and soon reached circles far beyond its locus. Here, for example, is just a portion of the topics to be found in Volume One’s Table of Contents:

Building a Log Cabin
Chimney Building
White Oak Splits
Making a Hamper out of White Oak Splits
Making a Basket out of White Oak Splits
An Old Chair Maker Shows How
Rope, Straw, and Feathers are to Sleep on
A Quilt is Something Human
Cooking on a Fireplace, Dutch Oven, and Wood Stove
Mountain Recipes

Preserving Vegetables

Preserving Fruit
Churning Your Own Butter

Slaughtering Hogs
Curing and Smoking Hog
Weather Signs

If you’re interested in traditional Americana, this series set the standard, and did so way back when a book this size cost (check the price on the cover) $3.95. The volume pictured above was the first—eleven more volumes (the most recent of which was published in 2004) comprise the series.

Foxfire continues today as the Foxfire Fund, a not-for-profit educational and literary organization that trains educators and oversees national programs on experiential education. Read more about the Foxfire Fund here.

—Lauren Alwan

Pages: 1 2



Welcome to Legacy Falls!


Families from Legacy Falls share a tradition of loss.

Lovers have said farewell at the Pleasant Street train station for seventy years.

Mothers have welcomed home their sons in the ticker tape return from war and loss.

After every war, every battle, Legacy Falls opens its arms and its hearts to the wounded warriors returning home.

These are their stories.

Platform Four – A Legacy Falls Romanceplatform-4-final
Eden Butler
Release Date – 10/5/16
Genre – Historical Romance

Every day for twenty years, a Mills family woman has manned the goods trolley at the Pleasant Street train station. Every day since the Second World War began, Ada Mills has watched the passengers come and go, secretly wishing for an adventure, a way out of Legacy Falls.

She never expected to find forever.

Garreth McGinnis only wanted a pack of smokes and a fresh baked scone from the pretty girl selling wares on his stop over train ride through a place called Legacy Falls. A smoke and a bite led him to the girl who he couldn’t keep from his thoughts as he lay awake at night fighting a war that shouldn’t have been his. One letter becomes two. Two becomes ten and Garreth spent the whole of the war completely under Ada Mills’s spell.

Falling in love through lines of ink was one thing. Meeting the future that waits on platform four once the war ends, is something altogether different.

Once the bombs have quieted and the soldiers return home, will the dreams of forever be all that Ada and Garreth’s letters promised or will reality leave the couple wishing they’d never sworn to meet on platform four?




iTunes, B&N, Kobo, etc.:

If you would like to find out more about the Legacy Falls Project, please join our Facebook page.

The Legacy Fall Project Includes:

Platform Four by Eden Butler

Behind My Charade by Skye Turner

Her Southern Temptation by Trish Leger

Dear Dixie by JL Baldwin

Iron Heart by Madison Street

Beyond the Ghosts by Jody Pardo

An Unexpected Hero by Diana Marie DuBois

Home by Morgan Jane

About the Authoreden author pic

Eden Butler is an editor and writer of Fantasy, Mystery and Contemporary Romance novels and the nine-times great-granddaughter of an honest-to-God English pirate. This could explain her affinity for rule breaking and rum.

When she’s not writing or wondering about her possibly Jack Sparrowesque ancestor, Eden patiently waits for her Hogwarts letter, edits, reads and spends way too much time watching rugby, Doctor Who and New Orleans Saints football.

She is currently living under teenage rule alongside her husband in southeast Louisiana.
Please send help.


Subscribe to Eden’s newsletter for giveaways, sneak peeks and various goodies that might just give you a chuckle.


Gimbling in the Wabe – It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s Gene Luen Yang!

Okay, I have to admit, I find last week’s announcement of the 2016 MacArthur Fellows (and their subsequent awarding of the generous – to the tune of $625,000-no-strings-attached generous – Genius Grants) to be incredibly exciting. One expects microbiologists, computer scientists, human rights lawyers, chemists, and the like to be named MacArthur Fellows, sure.  And […]

Comic Book Writer and Graphic Novelist Gene Luen Yang, 2016 MacArthur Fellow

Litstack Recs: Green Thoughts & Children of Time

Green Thoughts: A Writer in the Garden, by Eleanor Perényi If you’re a writer who gardens, Eleanor Perényi writes in her foreword, “sooner or later going to write a book about the subject—I take that as inevitable.” There are some heavy-hitting precedents to Pereyni’s classic of the writer-in-the-garden genre. Charles Dudley Warner’s My Summer in […]


LitChat Interview: Amy Tannenbaum

Amy Tannenbaum began her book publishing career with a brief stint at Harlequin where she edited romances that were far more entertaining than the books she read while earning her English degree at Wesleyan University. She then joined Atria Books, a division of Simon & Schuster, where she edited a diverse list of bestselling non-fiction […]


Six Diverse Writers Are Named 2016 MacArthur Fellows

Poet Claudine Rankine, writer Maggie Nelson, artist and writer Lauren Redniss, “long form” journalist Sarah Stillman, graphic novelist and comic book writer Gene Luen Yang, and playwright Branden Jacobs-Jenkins were named as 2016 MacArthur Fellows (along with 17 other “extraordinary individuals” in such diverse disciplines as linguistics, microbiology, computer science, financial services, sculpture, bioengineering, and […]

Maggie Nelson, one of six writers who have been named a 2016 MacArthur Fellow.

Winners of the 2016 British Fantasy Awards

The British Fantasy Society (an offshoot of the British Science Fiction Association) is an organization “dedicated to promoting the best in the fantasy, science fiction and horror genres.”   On Sunday, September 25, the winners of the 2016 British Fantasy Awards were announced at 2016 FantasyCon By the Sea in Scarborough, North Yorkshire. And here are […]

"Beyond the Stars" by Julie Dillon, winner of the 2016 British Fantasy Award for Best Artist

LitStack Recs: Dept. of Speculation & The North Water

Dept. of Speculation, by Jenny Offill With the release of Jenny Offill’s acclaimed second novel, there have been comparisons to Renata Adler’s Speedboat, a correlation that makes me sincerely regret missing that seminar in grad school. It would have been the perfect grounding with which to enter Offill’s wonderful, novel-in-fragments. Though describing the book in […]


Kirkus Prize Shortlists Announced

Founded in 1933, Kirkus has been “an authoritative voice in book discovery” for over 80 years.  The associated  Kirkus Reviews magazine gives industry professionals a sneak peek at the most notable books prior to their publication, and releases book reviews to consumers on a weekly basis.  The Kirkus Star icon affixed to selected reviews signifies […]


2016 Emmy Awards – The Writers

Lest we forget, stories come in many forms.  While we often think of them mainly in terms of novels, short stories, poetry and the like, some of our most enduring stories also come to us through the playwrights and screen writers who provide the framework for the stage plays, television shows and movies that capture […]


National Book Awards 2016 Longlists Announced

The mission of the National Book Foundation is to celebrate the best of American literature, to expand its audience, and to enhance the cultural value of great writing in America.  To that end, in 1950 they established the National Book Awards, bringing together the American literary community to honor the year’s best work in fiction, […]


LitStack Recs: The Marriage Plot & The Terror

The Marriage Plot, by Jeffery Eugenides “Heartbreak is funny to everyone but the heartbroken.” That ironic reflection comes early on the Jeffrey Eugenides’ lively 2011 novel. The observation is made by Madeleine Hanna, one of three central characters, all students at Brown University. We meet them on the morning of graduation in 1982, liberal arts […]


2016 Man Booker Prize Shortlist Announced

Today, the Man Booker Prize announced the six books that have been narrowed down to form the shortlist for their prestigious award.  The prize, which launched in 1969, aims to promote the finest in fiction by rewarding the best novel of the year written in English and published in the United Kingdom. The 2016 shortlist […]


Gimbling in the Wabe – Glorious Failures

My daughter was looking over the syllabus from a college English class that she had just started, and she was distraught over the thought of having to make an in-class critique of another student’s writing.  “I’m just not good at that sort of thing!” she despaired. I tried to allay her concerns by pointing out […]


Gimbling in the Wabe – A Story Unto Themselves

Over the last few years I’ve been writing the “Literary Birthday” blurbs that appear Monday through Friday on the LitStack sidebar; just a tiny life synopsis about a writer whose birthday occurs on that particular day of the year.  It’s been fun researching not only famous authors, poets, playwrights and journalists, but also writers that […]

Sara Teasdale, charcoal portrait by Brittni DeWeese

LitStack Review: Admiral by Sean Danker

Admiral Sean Danker Roc Books Release Date:  May 3, 2016 ISBN 978-0-451-47579-4 You’ve probably heard it/seen it/read it before, especially if you are a science fiction aficionado: the main character(s) wakes up on a ship at sail with no recollection how s/he got there and no idea where the ship is headed or what it’s […]

space mist

LitStack Review – Icon by Genevieve Valentine

Icon Genevieve Valentine Saga Press Release Date:  June 28, 2016 ISBN 978-1-4814-2515-5 ~ * ~ Welcome to diplomacy.  Adapt or die. There is something about Genevieve Valentine’s writing that I find… incredibly fetching.  While many authors compose stellar narratives and strikingly compelling prose, she is one of the few who creates worlds where the audience […]


Cover Reveal – Night Shift 2

Ten authors are bringing you more of your favorite stories and sneak peeks at future books in Night Shift 2. All proceeds of Night Shift 2 will be donated to the Keith Milano Fund. ❖Pucks, Sticks, and Diapers by Toni Aleo – First came love, then came the NHL, then came Baylor and Jayden with […]

night shift 2

“Children of Time” Wins 2016 Arthur C. Clarke Award

British author Adrian Tchaikovsky has won the Arthur C Clarke Award for his science fiction novel Children of Time. The juried award was set up in 1987 with a generous grant from Sir Arthur C. Clarke, a giant in the science fiction genre; a few of his works include 2001: A Space Odyssey, Childhood’s End, Rendezvous […]


Cover Reveal – Platform Four: A Legacy Falls Romance

  We’re delighted to end (albeit late) the Legacy Falls cover reveal tour–where we’ve featured eight great stories as part of the Legacy Falls charitable anthology project. Each author will donate a portion of their sales to the wounded or returning veteran charities of their choice.   Legacy Falls project summary: Families from Legacy Falls […]


2016 Chesley Awards Winners Announced

Last week, the Association of Science Fiction & Fantasy Artists (ASFA) announced the winners for the 2016 Chesley Awards during MidAmericon II, the 74th World Science Fiction Convention, held in Kansas City, Missouri.  Established in 1985, the Chesley Awards recognize individual artistic works and achievements during a given year. The nominees for, and winners of, […]

Artwork by Kinuko Y. Craft, winner of the 2016 Lifetime Artistic Achievement Chesley Award

2016 Hugo Award Winners Announced

The 2016 World Science Fiction convention was held in Kansas City, Missouri this weekend during MidAmeriCon II, and was highlighted by the announcement of the winners of the 2016 Hugo Awards.  The Hugo Awards are one of the most prestigious awards for fantasy, speculative and science fiction works, and winning a Hugo is quite the […]

"As the World Falls Down", illustration by 2016 "Best Professional Artist" Hugo Award winner Abigail Larson

Gimbling in the Wabe – Why Do People Read Bad Books?

Recently I’ve been reading What Makes This Book So Great, by Hugo and Nebula Award winning author Jo Walton.  In it, she takes various essays regarding the science fiction/fantasy genre originally blogged on, and incorporates them under a single cover.  It’s a fascinating read from a well versed and extremely well read woman who […]

guilty reading

There But for the Grace of God

Thirty-five inches of rain in four days.  That’s how much rain has fallen in Louisiana in this last “episode.”  The ground is saturated, and the rivers are cresting many feet higher than has ever been recorded.  The Amite River in Denham Springs hit 4.7 feet above its previous record set in 1983 on Sunday morning.  […]

Tees view

Cover Reveal – Beyond the Ghosts: A Legacy Falls Romance

  We’re delighted to kick off the Legacy Falls cover reveal tour–a week where we’ll feature eight great stories as part of the Legacy Falls charitable anthology project. Each author will donate a portion of their sales to the wounded or returning veteran charities of their choice.   Legacy Falls project summary: Families from Legacy […]

jodys book

LitStack Recs: Barbarian Days & Pride’s Spell

Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life, by William Finnegan William Finnegan took his time writing this memoir. An international journalist and staff writer for the New Yorker, wrote the book over fifteen years, Finnegan wrote the book between assignments here and abroad, reporting on the effect of poverty on American teenagers, the drug war in Mexico, […]


Cover Reveal – Home: A Legacy Falls Romance

  We’re delighted to kick off the Legacy Falls cover reveal tour–a week where we’ll feature eight great stories as part of the Legacy Falls charitable anthology project. Each author will donate a portion of their sales to the wounded or returning veteran charities of their choice.   Legacy Falls project summary: Families from Legacy […]

stunning sensual young couple in love posing in summer field at the sunset, happy lifestyle concept

Cover Reveal – Iron Heart: A Legacy Falls Romance

  We’re delighted to kick off the Legacy Falls cover reveal tour–a week where we’ll feature eight great stories as part of the Legacy Falls charitable anthology project. Each author will donate a portion of their sales to the wounded or returning veteran charities of their choice.   Legacy Falls project summary: Families from Legacy […]

Iron Heart

Cover Reveal – Her Southern Temptation: A Legacy Falls Romance

  We’re delighted to kick off the Legacy Falls cover reveal tour–a week where we’ll feature eight great stories as part of the Legacy Falls charitable anthology project. Each author will donate a portion of their sales to the wounded or returning veteran charities of their choice.   Legacy Falls project summary: Families from Legacy […]

southern temp

Closeup shot of woman feet standing on tiptoe while embracing her man at railway platform for a farewell before train departure. A travelling luggage is on the foreground. Beautiful warm sunset light and flare are coming from the background.


We’re delighted to kick off the Legacy Falls cover reveal tour–a week where we’ll feature eight great stories as part of the Legacy Falls charitable anthology project. Each author will donate a portion of their sales to the wounded or returning veteran charities of their choice.


Legacy Falls project summary:

Families from Legacy Falls share a tradition of loss.

Lovers have said farewell at the Pleasant Street train station for seventy years.

Mothers have welcomed home their sons in the ticker tape return from war and loss.

After every war, every battle, Legacy Falls opens its arms and its hearts to the wounded warriors returning home.

These are their stories.


TITLE: An Unexpected Hero: A Legacy Falls Romance
AUTHOR: Diana Marie DuBois13932119_1756667977880872_784484394_o
GENRE: Magical Realism/Romance


Sergeant Jackson Hamilton Ledet didn’t want to be a burden. Not to Bex, the woman he left behind to serve his country. Not to anyone. But returning home with an injury he fears he’ll never recover from Jackson faces the bitter knowledge that life as he knew it is over.

One Dear Jane letter to Bex and the deal is done, knowing he could never let her care for the half man he is now.

But Jackson’s return to his sleepy hometown of Legacy Falls offers more than the peaceful life he wants. It starts with a veterinary clinic, a dog and the woman he thought he could walk away from. Jackson knows life can be cruel but sometimes the unexpected surprises are enough to heal us all.

PRE-ORDER An Unexpected Hero HERE



Diana Marie DuBois resides in the historical and richly cultured-filled state of Louisiana and just outside of the infamous city of New Orleans. She shares her home with two beautiful Great Danes and four spunky rescued mutts. As a young girl, Diana was an avid reader and could be found in her public library. Now you find her working in her local library, where she reads everything and anything. She has many stories ideas running through her head, with plenty interesting characters.


Gimbling in the Wabe – Persistence

On summer nights – well, on many nights, really – I end the day out on my front porch, in the dark, relaxing on a wrought iron glider while my dog sniffs around in the yard one more time before we both retire for the night.  I like letting the quiet of the city sink […]


LitStack Rec: Manhood for Amateurs & Redshirts

Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son, essays by Michael Chabon The trope of fatherly wisdom, borne of experience and dispensed with measured calm, is a wonderful thing, but how realistic it? There are some great recent memoirs about fathers. Alysia Abbott’s Fairyland and Will Boast’s Epilogue come to […]


Man Booker Longlist Announced for 2016

The longlist for the Man Booker Prize was announced this week.  The prize, which launched in 1969, aims to promote the finest in fiction by rewarding the best novel of the year written in English and published in the United Kingdom. Said Amanda Foreman, chair of the judges of the award: “From the historical to […]

Man Booker longlist 2016


Russell Galen

Scovil Galen Ghosh Literary Agency

Russell Galen is a graduate of Brandeis University. He started within days as an apprentice to “the most colorful and successful agent of his era,” Scott Meredith, and he made his first sale within a month. When Scott died in 1993, he joined with the two other top agents there, Ted Chichak and Jack Scovil, to found Scovil Galen Ghosh Literary Agency.

He is seeking: In fiction, his passion lies within novels that stretch the bounds of reality. A novel needs to take him some place you can’t get to in a car, whether it be the past, the future, a fantasy world, an alternate historical track, a world in which our world touches another that is hidden or rarely seen, or one which has been changed by some new technology, event, or idea.

In nonfiction, he seeks strong, serious books on almost any subject—as long as they teach him something. He’s interested in science, history, journalism, biography, business, memoir, nature, politics, sports, contemporary culture, literary nonfiction, etc.

Some of Russell’s clients include Terry Goodkind, James Rollins, Cassandra Clare, Diana Gabaldon and Cory Doctorow.


LS: Thanks so much for taking the time to chat with us. I’ve read that early on you admired the relationship shared by F. Scott Fitzgerald and his agent Harold Ober. What satisfies you most about the relationships you have with your clients?

There’s something very appealing about being a terrorist: a small group of conspirators, trusting one another with their lives, united by common purpose, going up against a larger, more powerful, better-organized entity. That’s how it feels to work with a client: like conspirators preparing an attack.

This isn’t to say that the publisher is the enemy. The enemy is not the publisher but the publisher’s indifference. Victory is not destroying the publisher: victory is converting the publisher. Maybe a better metaphor would be a team of Mormon missionaries. Nah, that doesn’t feel right. I’ll stick with terrorists.

At various points in my career I’ve thought of myself as my clients’ editor, psychiatrist, financial advisor, life coach, lawyer, parent, brother, and friend. But nothing comes close to the collaborative satisfaction of plotting a strategy with an author (along with my staff and foreign/movie subagents), executing that plan, and seeing it succeed. Editorial strategy is followed by submission strategy and then by publication strategy.

LS: Did your desire for a career in publishing come from an early love of books? If so, what were your favorite books as a child?

Yes, from the earliest age I devoured books, but I don’t know that “love” is the word that comes to mind. It was an insatiable need. I’m not sure how healthy it was or what I may have sacrificed during my lifetime to feed that addiction. A simple love of books would have been nice but I was never given that choice. I love dogs, but I have been without a dog for about three years now and am not sure I’ll ever get another one. That’s love but it’s voluntary. I cannot go one day without a long reading session. When I’m on a plane I don’t panic about crashing but about my e-reader battery running out.

As for my favorite books, I went straight from “See Spot Run to adult fiction. I never read the children’s classics. I became interested in middle grade and young adult fiction only in recent years when I realized that some of the best storytelling was taking place in that field, but in my own childhood I was too eager to be a grownup. In 7th grade my teachers called me “the 40 year old man” because I was so serious.

When I was twelve I thought I would become a scientist, and in fact my son is now a grad student in biology so I think it’s legitimately in my genes. But then I read Isaac Asimov’s “Foundation Trilogy” and realized I was more interested in stories about science than I was in the science itself. So I gave myself over to reading and thought of myself as an English major (or whatever the 7th Grade equivalent is) rather than a science major.

I went on to read omnivorously, a hundred books a year, all types of fiction and nonfiction. The one thing I never read was something that didn’t have a story, so if it was nonfiction, it would be history, biography, a true-life adventure, and other forms of narrative nonfiction. Now that I am a middle-aged man, my taste hasn’t changed.

LS: What has been one of your proudest moments as an agent?

When an agent dies the obituary lists the famous writers he’s worked with. This is supposed to be the sum of his life’s meaning. I reject that. The fact that I worked with a certain household name does not mean my own life was meaningful as a result. Perhaps there’s a book that sold for a $500 advance to a tiny press by an unknown writer whose work would never have seen the light of day if not for me, and perhaps that’s more representative of the significance of my time on earth.

Look, I’ve been around a long time and made a lot of amazing deals. I’ve gotten mid seven figure paydays for clients, high seven figures, and low eight. I’ve invented new kinds of contract terms and new clauses that have shifted considerable amounts of money and power from the publisher’s side of the ledger to the writer’s. I am still doing that, inventing new kinds of electronic publication contracts that I strongly suspect will be the normal deals of the future.

I’ve steered clients from obscurity to fame, taking them from a four-figure first deal through a multi-decade career of unbroken success, leading to long runs on the New York Times bestseller list and publication in 40 languages.

I’ve helped develop new marketing strategies, shaking publishers out of their lethargy, getting them to think about innovative ways to reach new readers for my clients.

I’ve done all of that. But what I’m proudest of are the acts of fertilization or catalysis.

My first NY Times bestseller was THE MISTS OF AVALON by Marion Zimmer Bradley. Marion’s career was in the doldrums and I was her new agent. Over lunch we discussed a long list of projects, none of which excited me. Finally she said, “The one I really want to do is about the women of King Arthur’s court, but everyone tells me that that’s a bad idea.” I said, “Really? That’s the only idea I like out of your whole list.” She replied that in that case she would write it, and the rest is history. 20 million copies sold in 40 languages.

The greatest work of one of the great 20th century American novelists, VALIS by Philip K. Dick, is dedicated to me, and all because after I had newly taken him on, I gave him an idea for how to finish the book, which he’d been trying to finish for seven years.

Decades later I was in the home of Ted Kerasote, a narrative nonfiction author who’d done some highly regarded small press books about nature and wildlife. We just could not come up with a project for him that seemed like it could break him out to a major house. Finally he said, “The book I really want to write is the story of my dog.” The whole house was filled with pictures of this big, handsome, charismatic dog. So I said, “Okay, tell me about the dog,” and about half an hour later I said, “That’s your book.” It became MERLE’S DOOR, widely considered one of the finest animal stories of all time. It spent two months on the NYT bestseller list and has sold millions of copies.

I have lots of stories like this and many of them are about books that never became bestsellers or classics. Nevertheless they are meaningful books that would not have been published if I hadn’t somehow provided the catalyst.

LS: What about Sci Fi and Fantasy appeals to you not only as an agent but also as a reader?

I have a different answer for each.

I will always be a science fiction fan above all else because SF is the literature of ideas. For example, my client Cory Doctorow is the hip young Asimov. His novels are great reads, filled with action, adventure, and fast pacing. He is a great entertainer. But these books literally have a nonfiction book’s worth of thought-provoking information in them. You don’t realize it when you’re reading it because you are so engrossed in the suspense, but when it’s done, your mind whirls with what you’ve just learned, and with new ideas challenging your worldview.

What I love about fantasy is that it is built around the concept that human beings are always capable of heroic actions. It’s hard to imagine a fantasy that did not have human heroism and nobility as its primary fuel, even in the most complex and morally ambiguous works. Fantasy is about men and women rising to the occasion, even if they start out on the floor.

My client Terry Goodkind writes about the character Richard Rahl, who goes from being a simple woodsman to the lord of an empire. Terry and I discovered that when his fans needed to make a tough decision about something, they asked themselves, “What would Richard do?” Richard is someone who is always true to himself. His actions are a direct expression of his own nature, no matter what the consequences.

In my favorite novel in the series, FAITH OF THE FALLEN, Richard decides to carve a statue even though it puts him in clear danger. The simple act of making that statue — at great personal risk — ends up inspiring the citizens of an enslaved city to rise up and reclaim control of their own lives.

That is a great inspiration for people and I personally have been guided by it in my own decisions in life. This is what I get out of fantasy, this genre that people deride as childish but which for me fulfills the capacity for human aspiration that some other people find in religion.

I’m not going to distinguish between what appeals to me as an agent and what appeals to me as a reader. I’ve never represented a book just for the money. I take on the books that I want to read and then figure out how to maximize the author’s success from it.

I boasted of this once to another agent who said derisively, “So if Grisham calls, you won’t take the call.” This was a British agent so you can imagine the elegant acid with which he said it. But actually, that’s right. Grisham would never call me because it would be so obvious that I have no passion for his type of work, but if he did, I would steer him to someone else. If I could poach any author it would have been the late Michael Crichton. (I do have the new Crichton, my client James Rollins, so I’m good.)

LS: As someone whose career is focused on great fiction, are you ever able to read a book for pleasure without editing it?

No, that is a terrible thing about my career. I read a lot for pleasure but I don’t experience the joy of reading that I had in college. I am sure I will never have that again. If I simply want to be transported by a work of art it has to be in a field in which I have no specialized knowledge: specifically, classical music and painting. I sneak away to museums and concerts all the time just to avoid my internal editor, because I do not know how to make an Edward Hopper painting or a Shostakovich concerto any better.

LS: The distribution of self-publishing seems to have changed the dynamic of publishing somewhat. What do you think the future of publishing holds and how will these changes impact agents?

Electronic self-publishing is a great new field which has achieved two fine things.

First, it makes it possible for certain books to reach a small audience yet still remain viable. I don’t buy these books because I’m too busy reading manuscripts, but I’m ecstatic over the equivalent in music, where I can download all kinds of obscure classical music.

Second, it’s created a new kind of development lab for major publishers, supplementing the old development labs, which were primarily periodicals.

But I don’t see a threat to the existing power structure of big New York-based publishers lording it over the world.

Writers will still demand advances, sometimes very big ones. And they will still need well-funded, well-organized marketing campaigns. I don’t think individuals, or literary agencies with their new little publishing arms, or small presses, can succeed consistently because they will usually come up short in marketing and publicity.

Therefore I believe that writers will always need big houses (and therefore always need agents).

The big New York houses will have to change as the printed book disappears. They will morph into studios that find, finance, develop, publicize, market, and distribute a wide variety of digital reading products.

The lure of self-publishing is the high royalty, the independence, and the hope that you can have a success without a well-funded marketing campaign. This just isn’t a viable vision of the future of publishing. When the big houses start offering seven-figure advances for ebook originals, with a $250,000 ad/marketing budget, a 10-city promo tour, and a 50% royalty, self-publishing will go back to what it always was: merely an interesting way to begin a career.

The big houses will do this, although right now they don’t know it. They won’t have a choice. Once they get used to it they will find that it’s a better business model than what they have now, and they’ll be happy.

I am predicting this not because I prefer screens to paper (although I do, very much) but as a matter of economics.

The cost of books can only go up and the cost of ebooks can very easily go down. When a new hardcover is $250 (in the inflated dollars of some future era) and the ebook version is $10, and given all of the other advantages of the ebook, does anyone really think that a printed book will appeal to more than a niche market? In a world where there are three billion smartphones and tablets which everyone considers as necessary and unremarkable as underwear?

LS: What makes the manuscripts you take on stand out? What are the elements of your “perfect” manuscript?

I can’t imagine that I will ever encounter a perfect manuscript. But I can tell you what I look for, and which leaves me satisfied even in a deeply flawed manuscript. What interests me is characters who are on a personal journey which leaves them changed. For this reason I avoid certain types of series which rely on the main character being the same person in every volume. My favorite of all types of fiction are stories in which the characters’ journeys are so profound that they need to be spread over many volumes which are best read in order.

The “Outlander” series by my client Diana Gabaldon is a particular favorite of mine. It is a single unbroken story which currently covers eight volumes and about 2.5 million words, with more to come. The story covers decades, and during that time its protagonist has gone from a beautiful young woman to a hearty grandmother who still has a sexual appetite that would exhaust most college students. She has changed and grown and deepened over the course of those years while also managing to stay true to her core self, despite war, disease, death, and revolution.

Very few characters are complicated enough, and experience enough growth, to remain interesting for 2. 5 million words, and few writers can envision or create such characters. But when they do that’s my perfect literary experience.

LS: What questions should writers ask potential agents prior to signing?

Someone should do a checklist for this purpose, which would have dozens of questions. I could come up with such a checklist for you now but the questions would be pretty obvious:

Who are your other clients and titles?

How do you handle foreign rights?

What are some of your best deals?

What is your record-keeping like?

Have you ever been convicted of embezzlement….?

But there’s a problem. Any agent who has been through this process will have all of his answers down pat. He knows what you want to hear. Don’t you think Bernie Madoff had great answers for any new client who did his due-diligence before investing? If you ask an agent a lot of questions, what you are testing is the agent’s ability to provide persuasive answers. Nothing else.

That’s not to say you shouldn’t do it, but it goes only so far.

I had a guy ask me something recently which I didn’t feel I answered satisfactorily, but it led to a good discussion. He wanted to know what would happen if he failed: if his books didn’t sell to publishers or didn’t do well after being published.

I’ve been through this. I’ve dropped people because I thought we were at a dead end. In other cases I have nursed a relationship for years until it woke from its coma.

I wish I could say that it depends on my regard for the quality of the writer’s work, but that’s not it. I’ve dropped some geniuses, knowing their future biographers would castigate me for doing so.

And it’s not that I stick with writers out of friendship or personal affection. Some of my longest relationships have been with assholes. I have fished drunken clients out of bars, thinking to myself, “I wish I could rid myself of this contemptible lout” but then kept working with the writer for years.

I can’t explain the bonds that form between authors and agents and I can’t provide tools for predicting whether a new relationship will last.

But I do think that when authors are selecting an agent, the most important quality is personal compatibility, because you’re going to be working together for a long time.

A well-known writer came to me a few years ago who had had six previous agents. I called the most recent one, a friend of mine, and he said, “Stay away from that guy. He just can’t get along with agents.” I went ahead anyway because I was a huge fan of the author’s work and was thrilled to have him on my list, and we’ve never had any problem together. So it was just a question of finding the right match.

I do think it’s worth a trip to NYC to interview agents in person (or summon them to your home if you are already successful). Two hours over dinner (or in my case four) will tell you more than all the specific checklist questions you might ask.

LS: Is there a specific trend that you’re tired of seeing?

I don’t think this way. I’m interested in characters. If an author has produced unique characters, I’ll be hooked, even if the external world of that character is a cliché.

That said, one of my pet peeves is the phrase “character driven” as supposed praise for a novel. I don’t think creating one-of-a-kind, interesting characters is that hard. It’s hard, but the world doesn’t have a shortage of people with this talent. There is a slight surplus.

I also don’t think it’s hugely hard to create a suspenseful plot. Again, we have a small surplus of such people.

But for some reason God decided to give out one type of talent to some writers, and the other type to other writers, and rarely give both types to the same person. How many shortstops can field and hit? One in a million have that combination, and it’s the same in writers.

I’m looking for characters with layers and complexities whose lives are then kicked into high-speed motion by important, dangerous events. Get me that combination, and will always be able to get you a great deal.

I don’t care about anything else.

I know someone is expecting me to say “There are too many vampire novels” but that’s bullshit. The reason no one else wanted Marion Zimmer Bradley to write THE MISTS OF AVALON was because “there are too many Arthurian novels.”

One thing I’ve learned about trends is that it’s impossible to spot when they’re over. You can be sick of a trend, predict its imminent demise, then it continues to produce popular and important books for years. You can declare that a trend is here to stay forever and then a week later it crashes and you can’t make a sale.

So I just don’t concern myself with these things.

LS: How different is the industry now as opposed to when you began your career? Are you surprised by these changes?

I know I’m supposed to give the stock answer that things are just so amazing and different.

But if you’re asking me to talk about something amazing, what is amazing is the timeless nature of the business, and how little it has changed not just in my 30 years, but since Homer. If I lived another 100 years I think I would still be a good agent because my basic skills would still be 99% of what takes to succeed in this business.

Here is what we do. I communicate with another person (an editor) and tell them that I’ve just read something that I think they would really enjoy. They in turn try to replicate that process, first within their publishing house, then using mass media to reach readers. Doing that well is very hard but if we pull it off, the rest is a lot easier.

There are new communication media but it still comes down to an agent, an editor, a marketer, and a publicist, talking about a book in a way that will get other people interested.

Of course it’s exciting to figure out marketing plans using media that didn’t exist two years ago. If I could go back to my 1982 self and tell him how we sell books today he would think that I was living in a science fiction story. And I am. But it doesn’t feel different to me as I go about my day of talking to people on the phone, meeting with them, or writing them letters, about the talent of my clients and the potential of their work.

But I will tell you about one thing that interests me a lot and which is unthinkable without new technology.

My lifelong interest, as I mentioned, has been long-running series featuring characters who age, change, and grow. It’s a great literary form and it’s a great business because it’s addictive. But as with all drug pushers, our challenge is getting people hooked. Readers are wary of starting a series because they committing to reading millions of words.

The most exciting thing about the new media is the many opportunities they offer to market and promote the first novel in a series. This used to be impossible in a field that was focused on each season’s new hardcovers. What house would have a marketing budget for a novel published 20 years ago?

Today we have all sorts of ways to put the spotlight on an author’s backlist, using our ability to reach millions of fans cheaply via the Internet.

That is one of the few new marketing strategies that simply has no equivalent in the pre-ebook past. It’s a revolution because it makes it possible to market an author’s life work at once, tying frontlist and backlist together. I am always pushing publishers to do this more often.

For instance, we have a client, the #1 New York Times bestselling Young Adult author Cassandra Clare, whose works all take place in the world she created, the world of the Shadowhunters. Every time she has a new hardcover, everyone busts a gut to promote and market it, as one would expect from such a successful author.

But if you haven’t ever read any of Clare, the best thing for you to do is to read her first novel, CITY OF BONES, published in 2007. Today we can promote that novel, whether that means tweeting about it, producing a great website for it, or putting the ebook on sale for two weeks for a low price. It’s an addictive read and anyone who gives it a chance today is going to be hooked on the series. That’s going to boost hardcover sales when the next new book comes out. So we can promote the new hardcover not just by the usual means but by pushing her first novel long before the new hardcover comes out.

LS: How important is a knowledge of the business of writing in relation to writing a strong manuscript?

In terms of writing a strong individual manuscript it’s neutral, but it’s a benefit in terms of creating a successful multi-book career.

Big media companies are stolid and unimaginative. They don’t innovate. They can throw vast amounts of money, skill, and manpower at a book but their marketing tends to be five years behind the times; if something works, their instinct is to keep trying it. Writers and agents need to instigate and inspire publishers to try new ideas, to think big, and to take chances.

Writers have numerous advantages when it comes to promoting their own work. They don’t represent or publish anyone else: they are thinking about their own work 12 hours a day. The other 12 hours they are envying their peers and thinking about what can be learned from whatever success their rivals are enjoying. In today’s social media universe they are in touch regularly with their fans. Most important, they are creative people. They don’t just think outside the box; they think outside the planet.

Combine the creative engine of a novelist and a shrewd business sense, and you’ve got your own private Steve Jobs. And that’s what a writer can be if he or she is thinking about the business side of things.

I haven’t really answered your question. You asked about a knowledge of the business helping the actual writing process. I suppose you mean that a canny writer might study the business and learn how to write more commercially, either by writing in a trendy area or by shaping a manuscript to have more suspense or romance or whatever seems to be working in the market. Unfortunately, my experience has been that such efforts often have the opposite effect. It’s like thinking too hard about falling asleep, being a great parent, or having an orgasm. The more you think about it the harder it is to achieve. I’m wary of writers with theories about what the market wants or what type of book will sell better.

LS: What type of manuscript would you love to see make its way into your Inbox?

My professional career has been built around fiction that contains some element beyond the mundane and real. I’m rarely interested in handling conventional realistic fiction.

But I don’t think in terms of genre. Science fiction and fantasy are two genres that I enjoy very much, but I am interested in any type of novel that — as I say in the profile I created for our website — takes you someplace you can’t get to in a car.

Distinctions between mainstream and genre fiction have no meaning. The distinction that is meaningful is between works of unique individuality and works that merely exploit conventional ideas. I have handled the latter and they have their place, but no one needs them. What I need is work that could only have been written by the individual writer who wrote it. The work that bears the fingerprint of the author.

Who cares if something is labeled fantasy, science fiction, suspense, thriller, literary, commercial? My taste has nothing to do with any of that. I simply like works of the imagination.

About half my list is nonfiction, and I’m extremely receptive to new nonfiction projects. Science, nature, and the environment are areas of particular interest to me, but I’ll do a book on almost any subject if it uses a strong narrative structure to explore something of true significance.

A pet peeve of mine is when a nonfiction writer asks me what I think of a particular “idea.” Nonfiction books aren’t about ideas. They’re about ideas that are capable of being explored in the form of a story. If there’s no story, it might be an article but it’s not a book. If there’s a story but no idea, then it’s mere entertainment, which I do not handle.

dirtywork_smTitle: Dirty Work
Authors: Chelle Bliss and Brenda Rothert
Release: July 26
Genre: Romance


From authors Chelle Bliss and Brenda Rothert comes a smoldering standalone enemies to lovers romance that will, ahem…check all your boxes.

I hate him. Jude Titan is everything that’s wrong with the male sex: cocky, domineering and loaded with swagger. Oh, and did I mention he’s a Republican? Yeah, the guy’s so conservative he leans to the right when walking. And lucky me, I’m running against him for Senate. But I’ve got plenty of fight in me. A golden boy war hero opponent with a smile that leaves melted panties in its wake? Bring. It. On.
Damn, she’s sexy. Reagan Preston intrigues me from the moment I lay eyes on her. And speaking of laying…I want between those thighs. But I want to make her burn for me first. Every debate and stolen moment is foreplay for us. She claims she hates me, but her body tells a different story. I plan to win this election, but I also want to win the sharp, fiery Democrat who captures my attention like no woman ever has. Politics is filthy, just like all the things I want to do to Reagan Preston.
“Mr. Schultz. Thank you for allowing us here for what’s looking to be the start of a very interesting election season.” Her eyes dart to mine, and I hold her gaze, unfazed by her comment.
“I’m looking forward to a tough fight,” I say to her and hold out my hand, disregarding Carl’s presence. “I’m Jude Titan.”
“It’s wonderful to finally meet the man behind the name.” Her face flushes and she averts her eyes. “What would you say to your opponent, Representative Preston?”
“Well.” I pause for a moment and choose my words very carefully. “I’d tell her that, even though I’m not part of a long-standing political family like she is, I know how to win a battle, and I plan to defeat her this November.”
Carl steps forward and clears his throat. “He’s looking forward to showing Representative Preston that he’s a worthy adversary.”
When my eyes cut to his, he looks everywhere but at me.
“He may not be steeped in government, but he’s served his country with valor and honor and will do everything in his power to earn the respect of voters all over Illinois.”
I lean forward and whisper in his ear, “What are you doing?”
“Saving your ass,” he replies through gritted teeth.
“Do you have time for a one-on-one interview?” Ms. Campbell asks, tipping back on her heels nervously.
“He’s booked today, but if you call me—” Carl pulls a business card from his jacket and hands it to her “—I’ll make sure to schedule an interview as soon as possible.”
“Mr. Titan,” another reporter interrupts, sticking his recorder in my face.
Carl cuts him off, pushing the man’s arm down. “No more questions today. Please see the media spokeswoman, Ms. Jenkins, for any information or to schedule an interview in the future. It’s going to be a long season, ladies and gentleman. Mr. Titan has just announced his candidacy and needs to spend time tonight with his supporters who came to cheer him on.”
I want to argue with him, but he’s right. Tonight isn’t about the press. It’s about the people. People like me who rarely have a voice.
For far too long, I’ve been subjected to the deals many politicians made. The military is notoriously shortchanged and overworked because of special interest groups and in the name of the almighty dollar.
Americans are led to believe wars are fought for just reasons. Why else would they support them? Politicians tell lies to make the public accept the fact that thousands of lives will be lost in the name of saving the world from tyranny or terrorism.
But deep down, at the core of their decision to go to war, there’s another reason—an ulterior motive that seems to be missed by the masses.
Wars cost billions of dollars. The money is funneled from the US government to the weapons companies around the country.
War is big business.
Fortunes are made on the backs of US servicemen and women. They’ve given their lives for each dollar bill that lines the pockets of Washington’s elite.
It stops with me.
I’ll break the cycle and make people my first priority. Reagan Preston’s about to find out Marines always fight to win, no matter the cost.
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Brenda Rothert is an Illinois native who was a print journalist for nine years. She made the jump from fact to fiction in 2013 and never looked back. From new adult to steamy contemporary romance, Brenda creates fresh characters in every story she tells. She’s a lover of Diet Coke, chocolate, lazy weekends and happily ever afters.


CHELLE BLISS – AUTHOR BIO: Chelle Bliss, USA Today Bestselling author, currently lives in a small town near the Gulf of Mexico. She’s a full-time writer, time-waster extraordinaire, social media addict, and coffee fiend. She’s written over thirteen books and has three series available. She loves spending her free time with her boyfriend, 2 cats, and her hamster.
Before becoming a writer, Chelle taught high school history for over ten years. She holds a master’s degree in Instructional Technology and a bachelor’s in history. Although history is her first love, writing has become her dream job and she can’t imagine doing anything else.


Blog Tour & Giveaway: Thick & Thin by Eden Butler

TITLE: Thick & Thin AUTHOR: Eden Butler GENRE: Contemporary Romance RELEASE DATE: July 25, 2016 TOUR SCHEDULE SYNOPSIS: My love was thick. Her faith was thin. Somewhere in the middle is where life found us. I claimed her when I was a boy. I held her until I was a man. She was my first […]


LitStaff Rec: Blood Will Out & Zombie Baseball Beatdown

Blood Will Out, by Walter Kirn In Preston Sturges’  romantic comedy, “The Palm Beach Story,” Claudette Colbert plays Gerry, reluctant divorcee of husband Tom (Joel McCrea) who’s bankrupted when his dream of building an airport fails. On a train to Palm Beach, Gerry meets eccentric millionaire John D. Hackensacker III, America’s richest man. He’s Sturges’ […]





Fictional Rendezvous Book Blog

Bookalicious Babes Blog

J.M. Walker

Books and Bindings

Kitty Kats Crazy About Books

Kawehi’s Book Blog


Romance Schmomance

Hooker Heels Book Blog

Ms. Me28

The Book Obsessed Momma

Rough Draft Book Blog

Sammy’s Book Obsession

Movies, Shows & Books

Book Bangers Blog

Books to Breathe


Smokin’ Hot Books

The Romance Rebel



Foxy Blogs

Verna Loves Books

Red Hot + Blue Reads

Tied up in Romance

Love Romance Books

Badass Bloggettes


The Opening Hook

An Asian Chick & Her Cat Walk into a Book Blog

Devilishly Delicious Book Reviews

Red Cheeks Reads

Urban Smoothie Read


The Book Bellas

Fangirl Moments and My Two Cents

Erotic Romance Book Blog with Sandy

Literati Literature Lovers

True Story Book Blog


Nerdy Dirty & Flirty

One Book Boyfriend At A Time

Up All Night Book Blog


Fictional Family Ties

It’s been said that families are like fudge—mostly sweet with a few nuts. If we’re lucky, the balance between the two is just right, but even then, we have moments when we wonder what it would be like to have a different set of relatives. Reading gives us that opportunity. For the span of a […]

family ties

Gimbling in the Wabe – I Have a Son

I have a son.  He’s 26, works the late shift in the medical pharmacy at the University hospital.  Sometimes at night, instead of taking public transit home, he runs from work to his apartment near downtown – a couple of miles.  His apartment is not in the best part of town, but he likes living […]


LitStack Review: The Summer Dragon by Todd Lockwood

The Summer Dragon – First Book of the Evertide Todd Lockwood DAW Books Release Date:  May 3, 2016 ISBN 978-0-7564-0833-6 I first noticed Todd Lockwood as the artist who created such amazing illustrations for Marie Brennan’s “A Natural History of Dragons” series.  The cover artwork alone instantly established the sense of antiquity and nobility present […]

The Summer Dragon large

Litstack Recs: Blue Nights & Lustlocked

Blue Nights, by Joan Didion Joan Didion’s books have had a titanic effect on me, but when Blue Nights came out in 2011, I couldn’t bring myself to read it. The memoir is a counterpart to Didion’s 2005 memoir, The Year of Magical Thinking, which tracks the aftermath of her husband John Gregory Dunne’s unexpected death in 2003. […]


LitStack Review: Boy Erased by Garrard Conley

Boy Erased Garrard Conley Riverhead Books Release Date:  May 10, 2016 ISBN 978-1-59463-301-0 It was sheer coincidence that had me reading Garrard Conley’s book about his experience with a conversion therapy program aimed at curing him of the “sin” of homosexuality, but the timing did give my reading of it extra gravitas.  Not that Boy […]

Boy Erased large

2015 World Fantasy Awards Nominees Announced

  Finalists for The World Fantasy Awards (for works published in 2015) were announced this weekend, with the winners to be announced the last weekend in October during the World Fantasy Convention in Columbus Ohio.  The Awards, for the best fantasy fiction published during the last calendar year, have been handed out since 1975. The […]

Artwork by World Fantasy Awards nominated artist Richard Anderson

2015 Shirley Jackson Award Winners Announced

The 2015 Shirley Jackson Awards were presented on Sunday, July 10th at Readercon 27, Conference on Imaginative Literature, in Quincy, Massachusetts. Readercon Guests of Honor,  Catherynne M. Valente and Tim Powers hosted the ceremony. The winners for the 2015 Shirley Jackson Awards are: NOVEL WINNER: Experimental Film by Gemma Files Eileen by Ottessa Moshfegh The Glittering […]

The Haunting of Hill House

LitChat: Holly Root, Waxman Leavell Literary Agency

“My favorite part of being an agent is the thrill of discovery. Being the first to experience a new world or a brand-new author simply never gets old. Couple that with the joy of sharing that wonderful book with editors and eventually readers and you’ve got the reason I truly love my job.” Holly Root […]

holly root
The Patrick Melrose Novels, by Edward St. Aubyn

Edward St. Aubyn’s four novels, Never Mind, Bad News, Some Hope, and Mother’s Milk, collected in a single volume in 2012, are so brilliant it’s unimaginable that any reader (or writer) for whom words are the coin of the realm would elect not to read them. It’s not just the startling story line of its titular character, which follows Patrick from childbirth through drug addiction, marriage, and the death of his monstrous father and oblivious mother, but St. Aubyn’s prose itself. His language—elaborate, crystalline sentences—unwind with perfect order and disquieting depth. Think Proust, under the searing light of an inquisitor’s lamp.

Take for instance this description of New York, as the “flag-strewn mineral crevasses of mid-town Manhattan.” Or, if your tastes run to a more natural setting, the scene outside narrator’s ancestral home in the south of France on a moonlit night, where Patrick and a friend gaze up to the sky to find “a sky bleached of stars by the violence of the moon.” The word “squeak” is not one you’d think to find in a high tone work of literary brilliance, but there it is, in the setting of a hospital room: “a nurse squeaked in with a trolley of food.”

St. Aubyn knows what to do with words, and that is to subvert them, place them where they’re least expected, and most unsettling. I’m looking at his lines as though under a magnifying lens, but that is one of the pleasures of the extraordinary series. The story of Patrick Melrose, as you’ll see, is the proverbial icing on the cake.

Read James Woods’ on Edward St. Aubyn here.

-Lauren Alwan





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LitStack Recs: The Lesson of the Master & Ordinary Grace

The Lesson of the Master, by Henry James Colm Tóibín, in his introduction to the 2007 edition of Henry James’ classic novella, cites a note James made in 1888—an idea that came to him after reading the memoir of a colleague: “…it occurred to me that a very interesting situation would be that of an […]


LitStack Review: The Dinosaur Knights by Victor Milán

The Dinosaur Knights Victor Milán Tor Books Release Date:  July 5, 2016 ISBN 978-0-7653-3297-4 If the battle of Pelennor Fields number among some of your favorite scenes in JRR Tolkien’s “Lord of the Rings” trilogy, or if you are gripped by George RR Martin’s warfare in his “A Song of Ice and Fire” epic fantasy […]


Winners of the 2016 Locus Awards

This past weekend, the Locus Science Fiction Foundation announced the recipients of its 2016 Locus Awards during the Locus Awards Weekend held in Seattle, Washington.  Named after the monthly science fiction and fantasy magazine, the Locus Awards are now in their 45th year; winners are determined by an online survey of readers. This year’s Locus […]

Cover art for Brandon Sanderson's "The Way of Kings" by Michael Whelan, this year's Locus Award winner for Best Artist.

Gimbling in the Wabe – Clarity

Today, I plugged new headphones into my iPod and entered nirvana. That may seem somewhat dramatic, but trust me, it’s not.  I had been limping along in headphone purgatory for months.  One side worked, the other didn’t.  I could hear the music, and most of the melody and generally all of the lyrics, so they […]

Dessa at the Velvet Jones,on her "Into the Spin" tour. (photo by Wesley Bauman, ©2011)

LitStack Recs: Pictorial English Dictionary & Lake Country

The Oxford-Duden Pictorial English Dictionary (Second Edition, Oxford University Press) This week’s recommendation is obviously not a book for reading, but it is a book every writer should have. The Oxford-Duden Pictorial English Dictionary is an essential reference that is indispensable for writers, a guide to the exact names of things when “thingy,” won’t do. […]


LitChat Interview: Peg Alford Pursell, WTAW Press

  LitStack recently sat down with writer, editor—and now indie publisher—Peg Alford Pursell, a literary community builder with a grand passion for literature. Since 2010, she has curated and produced the monthly reading series Why There Are Words, one of the SF Bay Area’s leading live venues for authors, and recently launched WTAW Press, a […]


LitStack Review: Sweetbitter by Stephanie Danler

Sweetbitter Stephanie Danler Alfred A. Knopf Release Date:  May 24, 2016 ISBN 978-11-0187-594-0 Sweetbitter, the debut novel from newcomer Stephanie Danler, is a lot like New York City:  completely wrapped up in itself, which means it is sometimes incredibly pretentious, and at other times absolutely perfect.  It is, however, uniquely honest with itself and the […]

Author Stephanie Danler


Title: Hideaway
Series: Devil’s Night Series
Genre: Erotic Suspense
Author: Penelope Douglas
Release Date: TBD – 2017



COMING in 2017, HIDEAWAY is the second installment in the Devil’s Night Series! If you’ve read CORRUPT, this is Kai’s story.


You don’t even see me, do you, Kai Mori? No one does.

I’m the kid in the back, the one everyone dismisses, the no-life street punk with dirty finger nails and ripped jeans.

But I’m quiet, and I do my job. I can hang tough and no one does me any favors. I’ve always been on my own.

But then I see you…

Your perfect black suits. Your clean hands. The way you charge into the room, not afraid of the man I work for, and all of a sudden, I feel different.

Like maybe I want to know what you’re like with a woman.

As quickly as the urge comes, though, it disappears. You see, my boss has an agenda. He’s decided to put me in your path, but what he doesn’t realize is, I have plans of my own. A score to settle.

And you won’t know who I really am until it’s too late.

So sit tight. I’m coming to you.


You’re wrong. I’ve seen you before.

You’re the girl who looks like a fourteen year old boy and pretends everyone around her is public enemy #1. Yeah, I remember you.

Thunder Bay. Devil’s Night. Four years ago.

But the thing was…when your hat fell off that night, you looked nothing like a boy. And when I put my hands on you, you didn’t feel like one, either.

Now, after all this time, you’re in Meridian City, and while I don’t know who you are or want you want, I can’t wait to find out.

So come on. Door’s unlocked.

Just be warned, though…Devil’s Night is coming again, and I’m not alone this time.

My friends like to play, too.

Note from the Author: HIDEAWAY still has no definite release date. Erotic suspense takes longer for me to write, and while I hate to keep anyone waiting, I know you’d rather have a good book than a quick one. Bear with me. Getting this book to you is a priority. xoxo.

Buy Corrupt, Book 1

Amazon / Amazon UK / Amazon CA / Amazon AU / Kobo / Barnes and Noble / IBooks



About The Author:

Penelope Douglas is a New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal bestselling author. She dresses for autumn year round, loves anything lemon flavored, and shops at Target almost daily.

Her books include the Fall Away Series (Bully, Until You, Rival, Falling Away, and Aflame), as well as, Corrupt and Misconduct. Please look for Punk 57, coming September 2016 and Next to Never (A Fall Away Novella), coming January 2017.

She lives in Las Vegas with her husband and their daughter.

Follow Her Here:


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Title: Punk 57
Genre: New Adult
Author: Penelope Douglas
Release Date: September 20, 2016



“We were perfect together. Until we met.”


I can’t help but smile at the words in her letter. She misses me.

In fifth grade, my teacher set us up with pen pals from a different school. Thinking I was a girl, with a name like Misha, the other teacher paired me up with her student, Ryen. My teacher, believing Ryen was a boy like me, agreed.

It didn’t take long for us to figure out the mistake. And in no time at all, we were arguing about everything. The best take-out pizza. Android vs. iPhone. Whether or not Eminem is the greatest rapper ever…

And that was the start. For the next seven years, it was us.

Her letters are always on black paper with silver writing. Sometimes there’s one a week or three in a day, but I need them. She’s the only one who keeps me on track, talks me down, and accepts everything I am.

We only had three rules. No social media, no phone numbers, no pictures. We had a good thing going. Why ruin it?

Until I run across a photo of a girl online. Name’s Ryen, loves Gallo’s pizza, and worships her iPhone. What are the chances?

F*ck it. I need to meet her.

I just don’t expect to hate what I find.


He hasn’t written in three months. Something’s wrong. Did he die? Get arrested? Knowing Misha, neither would be a stretch.

Without him around, I’m going crazy. I need to know someone is listening. It’s my own fault. I should’ve gotten his number or picture or something.

He could be gone forever.

Or right under my nose, and I wouldn’t even know it.


About The Author:

Penelope Douglas is a New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal bestselling author. She dresses for autumn year round, loves anything lemon flavored, and shops at Target almost daily.

Her books include the Fall Away Series (Bully, Until You, Rival, Falling Away, and Aflame), as well as, Corrupt and Misconduct. Please look for Punk 57, coming September 2016 and Next to Never (A Fall Away Novella), coming January 2017.

She lives in Las Vegas with her husband and their daughter.

Follow Her Here:

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Finalists for the 2016 John W. Campbell Memorial Award Announced

The John W. Campbell Memorial Award was created to honor the late editor of Astounding Science Fiction magazine, now named Analog. Campbell, who edited the magazine from 1937 until his death in 1971, is called by many writers and scholars the father of modern science fiction. Writers and critics Harry Harrison and Brian W. Aldiss established the award […]


LiStack Rec: Cutting Teeth & Wonderbook

Cutting Teeth, by Julia Fierro When my daughter was little, there was a universally acknowledged sentiment among the parents I knew. We referred to  summer as the busy season, when the steady routine of the school year fell away and the schedule went overtime. Still, when your kids are small, there’s a lovely innocence to […]


Coming to the Stacks: New Deals for June 2016

Fiction – Debut Adrian Archangelo’s THE BALLAD OF ELVA AND CHESTER: Or, Mostly Their Fault, pitched as having shades of Tom Robbins meets Douglas Adams, about space aliens who appear to be human and have been here on Earth since the year 1100 with the goal of helping humanity develop more empathy and compassion and […]


“If man is to survive, he will have learned to take a delight in the essential differences between men and between cultures. He will learn that differences in ideas and attitudes are a delight, part of life’s exciting variety, not something to fear.”
― Gene Roddenberry




2016 British Fantasy Awards Shortlists Announced

The British Fantasy Society (an offshoot of the British Science Fiction Association) is an organization “dedicated to promoting the best in the fantasy, science fiction and horror genres.”   On Monday, the Society  announced its nominees for the 2016 British Fantasy Awards. The nominees include: BEST ANTHOLOGY African Monsters, edited by Margrét Helgadóttir and Jo Thomas […]

Illustration by BFA nominee Jeffrey Alan Love for the upcoming novel "Hammers on Bone" by Cassandra Khaw

LitStack Recs: Out of Place & The Grind

Out of Place: A Memoir, by Edward Said Edward Said, the prolific author, political activist, pianist and music critic rose to academic stardom in 1978 with the publication of the seminal Orientalism, a critique of the inaccuracies that founded Western study of the East. Said, who died in 2003 after battling a rare form of […]

the grind

LitStack Review: Ophelia by Lisa Klein

Ophelia Lisa Klein Bloomsbury USA Childrens Release Date:  December 26, 2007 ISBN 978-1-58234-801-8 Earlier this month, word broke on the entertainment wires that Daisy Ridley and Naomi Watts were in negotiations to star in a movie project based on Lisa Klein’s YA novel Ophelia, a story written from the viewpoint of one of most tragic […]

Ophelia close up

LitChat Interview: Patricia Nelson, Marsal Lyon Literary Agency

Patricia Nelson joined Marsal Lyon Literary Agency in 2014. She represents adult, young adult, and middle grade fiction, and is actively building her list. In general, Patricia looks for stories that hook her with a unique plot, fantastic writing and complex characters that jump off the page. On the adult side, she is seeking women’s fiction both upmarket and […]


Gimbling in the Wabe – My Thoughts on June Bugs

I hate June bugs. Yes, I realize “hate” is a powerful, laden word.  I realize that it should not be used indiscriminately or flippantly, for it is the main word we have for ultimate abhorrence.  Yes, I realize that I should consider using the word “loathe” or “despise” or  “detest” instead – something not quite […]

Artwork by Eva Gonzales - "Peonies and June Bug"

LitStack Review: Who Killed Sherlock Holmes? by Paul Cornell

Who Killed Sherlock Holmes? Paul Cornell Pan Books Release Date:  May 19, 2016 ISBN 978-1-4472-7326-4 London detectives James Quill, Tony Costain and Kevin Sefton, and analyst Lisa Ross form a unique team; they have been “gifted” with the Sight – the ability to see the hidden, supernatural side of London.  Its often not a pretty […]


Gimbling in the Wabe – Words, Words, Words

Polonius: What do you read, my lord? Hamlet: Words, words, words. ~William Shakespeare Although it can certainly be argued to the contrary, it seems that humans are the only creatures who use spoken language as opposed to creatures that “merely” communicate.  And although human language has existed for ages, written language has been around for only 4,000 years […]


LitStack Recs: Paris Stories & Javelin Rain

Paris Stories, by Mavis Gallant In this month of celebrating the short story (#ShortStoryMonth), there must be mention of one of my favorite collections, Mavis Gallant’s Paris Stories. Published in 2002, the book contains one of my favorite stories, Mlle. Dias de Corta. It concerns Mademoiselle, the boarder of a financially strapped Parisian widow, a […]


LitStack Review: The Spider’s War by Daniel Abraham

The Spider’s War Daniel Abraham Orbit Books Release Date:  March 8, 2016 ISBN 978-0-316-20405-7 In 2011, Orbit published The Dragon’s Path, the first volume of Daniel Abraham’s fantasy series “The Dagger and the Coin.”  Five years and four books later, The Spider’s War brings this superlative series to a close – and what an epic […]

spiders war

Gimbling in the Wabe – Peanuts and Crackerjacks

This is my favorite time of year.  Baseball season.  Early spring, and it’s still cool out.  We’ve yet to hit the heat and humidity of summer.  So far from October, and the post-season, there is still hope in the air, regardless of the team’s record so far.  This year, for my team, it’s a scant […]


LitStack Review: The Brotherhood of the Wheel by R. S. Belcher

The Brotherhood of the Wheel R. S. Belcher Tor Books Release Date:  March 1, 2016 ISBN 978-0-7653-8028-9 I grew up in the 1970s, mostly in small towns in the Midwest.  The truckers that would go rumbling down the highways that invariably transected our tiny burgs were legendary in their mystique.  As kids, my sisters and […]

brotherhood of the wheel

2015 Nebula Award Winners Announced

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) announced the winners of the 2015 Nebula Awards in a50th anniversary ceremony held in Chicago over the weekend, hosted by comedian John Hodgman.  Also announced were the awards for the Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation and the Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science […]


2015 Bram Stoker Award Winners Announced

At this year’s StokerCon convention, in the glitz and glamour of Las Vegas, the Horror Writers Association – the premier organization of writers and publishers of horror and dark fantasy – announced the winners of the 2015 Bram Stoker Awards (named in honor of the author of the seminal horror novel, Dracula). The winners and […]

StokerCon 2016 Facebook Banner

Gimbling in the Wabe – Inspiration in Transitions

Today at the dog park, one of the topics discussed by us “8:30 regulars” included high school graduations.  It is, after all, that time of year, for mortarboards and diplomas and college visits and looking forward.  Some of the folks at the park have kids who are graduating in a few weeks, or next year; […]

Andy's graduation 037

The Love of A Good Woman, stories by Alice Munro

The short story has few practitioners as skilled as Alice Munro, now 84, who as far as I’m concerned, is a writer who’s all but required reading in #ShortStoryMonth. Munro famously began writing stories as a young mother, finding the story took “less time.” Lucky for readers that the genre turned out to be one that suited her. Since her first collection appeared in 1968, she has produced fourteen in all—and garnered numerous awards and prizes, including Canada’s Governor’s General Award, PEN/Malamud Award, the Rea Award for the Short Story, O. Henry Award and many more.

Munro is known for stories set in her home landscape of western Ontario, Canada, and focus on the intricacies of relationships in ways that are never sentimental. Her stories are told in a voice that intimates the deepest thoughts and feelings of a character, but are never cloying or sentimental. Munro is the furthest thing from it: her narrators are sharp-witted, sardonic, even biting in their observations.  So where to begin when first entering Munro country?

My recommendation is to begin mid-career. It’s there you’ll find her classically novelistic stories—where the density of novel is packed into thirty or so pages. The stories of this period may not be as stylistically daring as those in recent collections like Runaway, but there is something classically satisfying about the stories written 1982 and 1998, and the collections are, in this reader’s view, vintage Munro. “The Moons of Jupiter,” “The Progress of Love,” “Friend of My Youth,” and “The Love of A Good Woman” are some of Munro’s classic stories. As impossible as it is to choose, I’d direct first-time Munro readers to the collected titled The Love of A Good Woman. There you will find such classic stories as “The Children Stay,” a chilling tale of adultery and its effects viewed from the perspective of years later. Or “Before the Change,” an epistolary account of the adult daughter of a widowed country doctor, who, moving back home learns the secret the housekeeper had been blackmailing him with for decades. The title story of the collection is a domestic murder mystery, with an ailing husband, a devoted nurse, curious boys, and clues set down in a collage of time and memory.

Munro revels in what she calls “knotty” situations, where she can hold a mirror up to the complexity of life and apply her astonishing eye to the details, gathering time and events in her own unique fashion. Munro has famously referred to her narrative structure as that of a house, in which the reader is free to wander through its rooms in any order she pleases. It’s a way she herself prefers to read stories, she’s said. Though in the end, read them in any order you prefer, just be sure to take your time and savor them.

—Lauren Alwan

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LitChat Interview: Kimberly Brower, Rebecca Friedman Literary Agency

Kimberly Brower represents a wide range of authors, particularly those who write contemporary romance, women’s fiction, thrillers and young adult. Her clients are New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Amazon best selling authors, who are both traditionally and self published. Although she loves all things romance, she is also searching for books […]

Kimberly Brower

LitStack Recs: Thunderstruck & Other Stories & Seven Brief Lessons on Physics

Thunderstruck & Other Stories, by Elizabeth McCracken With April declared National Poetry Month, May is now officially Short Story Month, dedicated to reading, sharing, applauding and promoting the short story. On Twitter, Knopf has launched the hashtag #shortreads with links to stories, events, appreciations and advice. Given my deep appreciation of short stories, it seemed […]


LitStack Review: Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho

Sorcerer to the Crown Zen Cho Ace Books Release Date:  September 1, 2015 ISBN 978-0-425-28337-0 Magic and mayhem in proper English society during what feels to be the Regency era?  A Royal Society of Unnatural Philosophers, a Sorcerer Royal who is (gasp!) a black man, and a small but growing movement to allow women to […]

Sorcerer dragon

2016 Locus Award Nominees Announced

Quickly becoming one of the premier science fiction/fantasy literary awards out there, the Locus Awards are determined by polling the readers of Locus magazine (subtitled The Magazine of The Science Fiction & Fantasy Field), both in print and online.  Locus was founded in 1968 and the awards themselves were first handed out in 1971. This […]

Featured artwork by Galen Dara, one of the 2016 Locus Awards nominated artists.

2015 Shirley Jackson Award Nominees Announced

If you are a reader of horror stories, or those that invoke psychological suspense, then you probably know the name Shirley Jackson.  Ms. Jackson wrote such classic novels as The Haunting of Hill House and We Have Always Lived in the Castle, as well as the well known short story, “The Lottery.” To honor the legacy of Shirley […]

Shirley Jackson Awards

LitStack Review: Arkwright by Allen Steele

Arkwright Allen Steele Tor Books Release Date:  March 1, 2016 ISBN 978-0-7653-8215-3 Allen Steele is a prolific science fiction author who has won three Hugo Awards, serves on the Board of Advisors for both the Space Frontier Foundation and the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, and is well known for his Coyote Series […]

Arkwright rings

CR Banner - Thick & Thin

Title: Thick & Thin (Thin Love, #3)
Author: Eden Butler
Genre: NA | Contemporary Romance
Release Date: July 25, 2016

Thick and Thin Cover 800x1200



My love was thick.
Her faith was thin.
Somewhere in the middle is where life found us.

I claimed her when I was a boy.
I held her until I was a man.
She was my first thought every morning, my last smile at night, and a million memories in between.
Then one night, with her warmth still lingering on the sheets, Aly King walked away from me, from us, from our life.

They say time heals all wounds, but not for me.
Not when my heart is empty.
Not when there is nothing but a sea of meaningless faces wherever I go.
It always comes back to her.
Aly needs reminding of how drunk our love made us, before she forgets completely.
Before we lose our chance.
Before we are irrevocably broken.


Books in the Thin Love Series

About Eden Butler

Eden Butler is an editor and writer of Mystery, Suspense and Contemporary Romance novels and the nine-timEden Butler Pices great-granddaughter of an honest-to-God English pirate. This could explain her affinity for rule breaking and rum.

When she’s not writing or wondering about her possibly Jack Sparrowesque ancestor, Eden patiently waits for her Hogwarts letter, edits, reads and spends way too much time watching rugby, Doctor Who and New Orleans Saints football.

She is currently living under teenage rule alongside her husband in southeast Louisiana.

Please send help.


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Arthur C. Clarke 2016 Finalists Announced

Now here are some awards finalists that we can feel good about! The Arthur C. Clarke Award is given for the best science fiction novel first published in the UK during the previous year. The award was established with a grant given by Sir Arthur C. Clarke and the first prize was awarded in 1987 […]

AC Clarke quote

LitStack Rec: Memoirs of Place & The Bassoon King

On Memoirs of Place: A Quick List I always appreciate a good memoir that centers on place. And luckily, there are writers who view setting as a key element of experience. For this reader, when place, any place, has a role in the account—a crumbling childhood home in Far Rockaway, N.Y., a remote mountain road […]

bassoon king

2016 Hugo Finalists Announced

The finalists for the 2016 Hugo Awards have been announced.  They include: BEST NOVEL Ancillary Mercy by Ann Leckie The Cinder Spires: The Aeronaut’s Windlass by Jim Butcher The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin Seveneves by Neal Stephenson Uprooted by Naomi Novik   BEST NOVELLA Binti by Nnedi Okorafor The Builders by Daniel Polansky Penric’s […]

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Gimbling in the Wabe – Our Shakespeare

Saturday is the 452nd anniversary of what we believe was the birth date of William Shakespeare, and the 400th anniversary of what we know was the date of his death.  The assumption is that he was born on April 23, 1564, not because there is a definitive record of his birth, but because we do […]

William Shakespeare wallpaper

LitStack Rec: my name on his tongue & Hild

my name on his tongue, by Laila Halaby In the climate of inflamed rhetoric about immigrants that has predominated in this election year, a small, quiet book like Laila Halaby’s my name on his tongue can speak volumes. In her first book of poetry, published in 2012, Halaby mines issues of identity, geography and the […]


2016 Pulitzer Prizes Announced

The Pulitzer Prizes are awarded annually for achievement in newspaper and online journalism, literature and musical composition in the United States.  They were established in 1917 by provisions in the will of Hungarian born Joseph Pulitzer, the esteemed publisher of the New York World and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.  They are administered by Columbia University. This […]


Crash Course: essays from where writing and life collide, by Robin Black

The third book from short story writer and novelist Robin Black collects her recent essays, many of which first appeared on the great, and sadly erstwhile literary blog, Beyond the Margins. Crash Course, subtitled essays from where writing and life collide, is aptly divided into two sections. Part One, LIFE (& Writing), is followed by WRITING (& Life), and both perspectives offer insights writers will find instructive and heartening. Crash Course, while lending wisdom on a range of writing and business-of-writing topics, also reads like a memoir, showing us the writer as she reckons with her past and the self that has emerged. I especially appreciated the forthright stance Black takes with her struggles, aspirations, doubt, and sense of accomplishment, all delivered in the deft prose for which her fiction is highly praised.

There is, for example, the late start to her work as a writer—re-married with two small children, battling the dread and desire to write, while at the same time being derailed by agoraphobia. There is too, the sorrow and shame of the years of delayed work, a regret that Black sometimes finds hard to shake. Years later, despite the leap of enrolling in a graduate creative writing program and the subsequent success of two books (a story collection If I loved you I would tell you this, and a novel, Life Drawing), the worry can still persist:

“On any given day, I don’t know if I will be able to write, I don’t know if I will like what I produce…I don’t know whether, if published, it will find readers for whom it ‘succeeds’…I don’t know if I will be publicly insulted or lauded for the work I have done, or ignored.”

That unpredictability, and uncertainty, she points out, is also a state writers seek, even though (or perhaps because) it’s uncomfortable. As Black wisely observes, the rewards that come with its risks are “something for which to be grateful.”

The essay “AD(H)D I” looks at the futility of trapping oneself, and others, in a cage of perfection. As an adult with Attention Deficit Disorder, there is a period in which Black’s life is in a general state of upheaval with lack of focus and follow-through. She encounters the proverbial opposite upon meeting the man who would be her second husband, an organized, seemingly unflappable person who, as Black tells it, brings a sense of order to the chaos—though not without its complications. This orderly, attentive man unwittingly throws her own qualities into a less-attractive high relief:

“…he found my left sneaker, cleaned our clogged gutters, replaced our souring milk, and remembered to pay our bills. The bastard!”

What this essay achieves, as do so many in this collection, is the quick pivot from life to writing. In “AD(H)D I”, the turn takes place as the couple comes to an understanding based on mutual empathy—an event that for Black brings a revelation—that her husband isn’t the one who needs to change. This epiphany, as she next points out, though groundbreaking in real life, isn’t as effective in fiction, adding, “the bar for plausibility is higher in fiction than in fact.” This essay runs early in the collection, but in the facile shift from life to writing we understand how Black means to show us the way each is informed by the other.

 Crash Course is also a lesson in the short essay. Most pieces run two to five pages yet each feels complete, and effortless. Black looks at a range of issues, among them: on writing query letters (including the author’s own. Tip: think voice); on inaction in fiction; revision and letting go of first ideas; on the excellence of adverbs (shout out to Truly, Madly, Deeply); true-life anecdote versus the narrative needs of story; and some qualities of distinctive fiction (hint: momentum, authority, and “a confident intelligence”).

One of the most fascinating threads in this collection is Black’s relationship with her father, a brilliant, complicated, and troubled man whose role in her personal history is clearly powerful. In matters of achievement, we learn, the elder Black’s view was “If it isn’t to be a work of genius, it isn’t worth writing,” a standard that rendered Black, in her words, “a study in blockage.” She writes, “Even as I battle the toxic standards of success that my father breathed into my dreams, I find myself grateful for his example of how fiercely one can try to fight a demon down.”

That personal history made me wildly curious about this larger-than-life formative relationship and its role in forging the writer from her nascent self. I can guess an author as inventive, smart, and anchored by deep feeling as Black has plenty of projects in the queue, any of which I’d eagerly read, and it would be thrilling if that memoir were among them.

Read more about Robin Black here.

—Lauren Alwan

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National Library Week: How a Library Saved My Life

April 10 – 16 is National Library Week, and this year’s theme is “Libraries Transform“, reminding all Americans that today’s libraries are not just about what they have for people, but what they do for and with people. Have you been to your local library lately?  They really have become amazing places.  If you’ve been to one […]


Gimbling in the Wabe – Sometimes It Snows in April

Since my plans for an original Gimbling in the Wabe went a bit off the rails this week, I’m taking advantage of this morning’s snow to dust off a former offering.  Even though today’s snow was nothing even remotely like what came down in 2013 (when this essay was first published), it nevertheless was honest to goodness snow, and this […]

snow pansy

LitStack Recs: Changing My Mind &

Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays Zadie Smith This collection of essays came about by accident, Zadie Smith tells us in the foreword, but the voice and curiosity behind it makes this read seamless and satisfying. My hope, as a reader of essays, whether the topic is snow camping or religious fanatics or Monarch butterflies, is […]


2016 Aurora Awards Shortlist Announced

The Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy Association has announced their shortlists for the 2016 Aurora Awards, honoring the best works and activities by Canadian science fiction/fantasy authors and enthusiasts, both professional and fan-based, in 2015.  The winners will be announced in August at Canvention, to be held in Calgary, Alberta. The nominees for the Aurora […]

Canadian spangles

Blog Tour: Catching Serenity by Eden Butler

  TITLE: Catching Serenity (Seeking Serenity Book 4) AUTHOR: Eden Butler GENRE: Contemporary Romance BLOG TOUR: April 1 – 9   SYNOPSIS It began with a look. Just one, thrown my way. A mad, dizzying rush of desire cracking across the patio, bouncing around my friends, ignoring everything but the heat bubbling between his eyes […]

CatchingSerenity_CVR_LRG copy

Gimbling in the Wabe – Tangible Authors

I am an extremely lucky person.  At times when I am feeling particularly magnanimous, I would even say that I am blessed. I live in an existence where I am surrounded by books.  I own books, I can download books electronically, I have a library nearby where I can not only check out books but […]

The featured photo this week is of Hugo Award winning author John Scalzi ("Redshirts", "Old Man's War", "Lock In", etc.) with one of his cats.  His kitties have their own Twitter account: "The Scamperbeasts", with over 6,000 followers.  They have a ways to go to catch up with Scalzi, though - he currently has more than 97,000 followers on Twitter.

2015 BSFA Award Winners Announced

The British Science Fiction Association announced the winners of the 2015 BSFA Awards on March 26 at the British National Science Fiction Convention (known as Eastercon), held in Manchester.  For the first time ever, the award for Best Novel and for the Best Short Story went to the same person:  Aliette de Bodard.  Of winning both […]


LitStack Review: The Past by Tessa Hadley

The Past Tessa Hadley Harper Release Date:  January 5, 2016 ISBN 978-0-06-227041-2 As I read Tessa Hadley’s newest novel, The Past, I had the same feeling as when I eat brussel sprouts.  To be honest, I don’t particularly care for brussel sprouts; they are somewhat of an acquired taste for my rather pedestrian palate.  But […]

(Photo credit:  Author Tessa Hadley walking through an abandoned house and gardens in Somerset, England, by Gareth Phillips for the Wall Street Journal.)

Announcing the Winners of the 2015 Aurealis Awards

The winners of the 2015 Aurealis Awards – Australia’s speculative fiction awards, named after the esteemed literary magazine – were announced this weekend at CONTACT2016, the 55th annual Australian National Science Fiction Convention, held in Brisbane, Queensland.  Also announced was the recipient of The Convenors’ Award for Excellence, which recognizes a particular achievement in speculative […]


2015 National Book Critics Circle Awards Announced

The National Book Critics Circle has announced the winners of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Awards, as well as honoring the recipients of three direct (non-shortlisted) awards. Take a look! FICTION WINNER: The Sellout by Paul Beatty Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff The Story of My Teeth by Valeria Luiselli The Tsar of […]

Natl Book Award Fiction Winners 2015



They are the lost boys.

Sons of mafia mistresses expected to keep their fathers’ sins in the shadows. The lucky ones are forgotten.KM_TheEnforcer

Unfortunately for Valentino “Tino” Moretti, his brother Nova was too smart to be forgotten, and too valuable to risk when he resists a life of crime. So they punished Tino instead. Forced into the cruel world of the Sicilian Mafia at twelve, Tino was broken before he was old enough to know the man he was supposed to be. Now he’s what the mafia made him.

The enforcer.

A trained killer forbidden to love, but he did anyway. He’s loved Brianna all along.

Raw and beautiful, their romance was all consuming and far too dangerous. They were ripped apart a long time ago. It’s not until the borgata puts out a hit on her that Brianna falls back into Tino’s arms, churning up their dark past and unraveling all the Moretti brothers’ closely guarded secrets.

This isn’t the end of the story. It’s only the beginning, and it is brutal.

There’s a reason enforcers are considered too deadly to love.




Hello! It is Kele Moon, hopping through the internet to spread the word about my latest book, The Enforcer. Finally, Tino’s book is out. Here is a little snippet from the story. Thank you to all the blogs hosting the tour! Be sure to enter the rafflecopper and comment on tour posts for a chance to win a chance for one of four $10 Amazon gift certificate or one of two books of Viper.  The giveaway starts March 20, 2016 and ends April 2, 2016.



Brianna stepped back when she saw Tino staring at her.

Her cheeks flamed with embarrassment.

She glanced away from Tino still spread out on the couch, thighs apart, cock straining against his jeans, with his washboard abs, broad chest, and thick biceps all on display. His full lips were illuminated in the moonlight from the glass windows showing off the six-million-dollar Midtown view Moretti money afforded Carina.

He was a fantasy come to life, and she would have to be dead not to look, but that didn’t mean she wasn’t mortified to be caught. “Y-you were talking in your sleep,” she lied. “I was checking to see if you were okay.”

“I wasn’t sleeping.”

His voice had a rough edge to it that gave Brianna goose bumps. Still she avoided looking at him as she argued, “You made a sound. You were dreaming.”

Tino quirked an eyebrow at her. “I knew you were watching.”

“Oh.” She closed her eyes when she realized that low groan and the arch of his hips were for her benefit. “You wanted to embarrass me. You succeeded. So congratulations.” She didn’t know if she was angrier with Tino or herself. “I’m going back to bed.”

She turned to leave, but he called out, “I’ll let you watch. If that’s your thing…I’ll do it.”

Brianna turned back to him with wide eyes, because she really couldn’t believe he meant what it sounded like he meant.

Who would do that?

Tino stared at her, unblinking, bedroom eyes hooded and dark in the moonlight. “Is it your thing?”

“Is what my thing?” Her voice was raspy with fear and desire. Her heartbeat was thundering, and the ache between her thighs was overwhelming. “Watch what, exactly?”

“Watch me jerk off thinking about you,” he said without even flinching. Then he cupped himself through his jeans like he had before when she thought he was sleeping, and arched his hips up. “Want it?”

She felt hypnotized by him and the raw sexuality that was choking the air out of the living room. She nodded silently, her gaze on his hand and the way he grabbed himself.

“Yeah,” she said, not sure if she shocked him more or herself when she admitted, “I want it.”

He raised his eyebrows skeptically, making it obvious she surprised him, but he pulled at the button to his jeans anyway. “You sure?”

Brianna looked to the opened fly, the zipper sliding down from the strain of his cock pressing against it. She nodded again. “I’m sure.”

Maybe she just wanted to know she could meet him halfway.

There was such a hard, deadly air to Tino now. Life made him feral, and no matter how beautiful he was, touching him now was dangerous, but she still wanted it…desperately.

He forced the zipper the rest of the way down, still watching her intently, making Brianna very aware of the spaghetti-strap nightgown she wore. The way his gaze ran over her body had her realizing the city lights behind her caused the thin blue material to be see-through. He stopped and stared at the V of her nightgown, unapologetically eyeing her tits.


Brianna’s nipples had tightened, and Tino noticed because he missed nothing. She folded her arms over her chest and shifted where she stood.

“Yes. A little,” she admitted and looked toward the closed door to Carina’s room. “Aren’t you?”

“Nope.” Tino pushed his jeans down to prove his point, exposing a pair of tight blue designer briefs that made him look like an underwear model.

Brianna knew he was big, but seeing the way his cock filled out those briefs, curving to the left and nearly pushing past the waistband, had her gripping at her grandmother’s cross around her neck simply because she needed to do something with her hands.

He actually went so far as to kick off his jeans and push the blanket to the floor, leaving himself vulnerable to Carina or Paco walking out. More so, putting himself on display for Brianna, and she couldn’t help but ask, “Aren’t you embarrassed?”

He cupped himself again. “Do I look like I have something to be embarrassed about?”

“No.” Brianna shook her head.





A freckle-faced redhead born and raised in Hawaii, Kele Moon has always been a bit of a sore thumb and has come to enjoy the novelty of it. She thrives on pushing the envelope and finding ways to make the impossible work in her story telling. With a mad passion for romance, she adores the art of falling in love. The only rules she believes in is that, in love, there are no rules and true love knows no bounds.

So obsessed is she with the beauty of romance and the novelty of creating it, she’s lost in her own wonder world most of the time. Thankfully she married her own dark, handsome, brooding hero who has infinite patience for her airy ways and attempts to keep her grounded. When she leaves her keys in the refrigerator or her cell phone in the oven, he’s usually there to save her from herself. The two of them now reside in Florida with their three beautiful children, who make their lives both fun and challenging in equal parts—they wouldn’t have it any other way.


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Gimbling in the Wabe – A Thousand Words

* This Gimbling was first published in 2013.* Anyone who has eaten a ripe, juicy peach knows how messy they can be.  No amount of slurping will keep the juice from running down your chin, if you eat it straight from the pit with no napkin to contain it.  Eating a ripe, juicy peach – […]


LitStack Rec: My Misspent Youth & Three Parts Dead

My Misspent Youth, essays by Meghan Daum My introduction to Daum and her essays was Life Would Be Perfect If I Lived In That House, her account of wanting, finding, losing and finding the ideal home. In a way, it’s a memoir of coming into one’s own, though in the context of money matters—real estate, […]


LitStack Rec: The Empty Family & The Last Witness

The Empty Family, by Colm Tóibín  Colm Tóibín’s story collection, The Empty Family (released January 4, 2011) is one I always keep close by, dipping into the pages to take in the voices of its starkly vivid narrators. The prose is emotionally precise in the tradition of William Trevor and Edna O’Brien, as Tóibín’s stories […]

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2016 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction Longlist Announced

On Tuesday – International Women’s Day – the longlist for the Baileys Woman’s Prize for Fiction was announced.  The British prize, now in its 10th year, celebrates excellence, originality and accessibility in women’s writing from throughout the world. Works on the longlist include: A God in Ruins by Kate Atkinson Rush Oh! by Shirley Barrett […]

Baileys longlist 2016

Happy Birthday, Tee!

    We here at LitStack couldn’t let the day pass without wishing a very happy birthday to our illustrious leader, Editor-in-Chief Tee Tate!  Not only is Tee a wonderful boss who has put so much love and effort into this website, but she’s a talented novelist, a good friend, and an all around incredible […]

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2015 Kitschie Award Winners Announced

The winners of the 2015 Kitschie Awards – the most tentacular of all literary prizes (!) – which rewards the year’s “most progressive, intelligent and entertaining works that contain elements of the speculative or fantastic,” were announced last night in a ceremony in London, England.  (The awards are sponsored by Fallen London, the award-winning browser […]


LitStack Review: The Providence of Fire by Brian Staveley

The Providence of Fire Chronicle of the Unhewn Throne, Book II Brian Staveley Tor Books Release Date:  December 8, 2015 ISBN 978-0-7653-3641-5 Brian Staveley seems like such a nice young man.  Former teacher, editor at a small press specializing in poetry, he lives in Vermont and “divides his time between running trails, splitting wood, writing, […]

Providence of Fire

Gimbling in the Wabe – Too Many Books

An oldie, but a goodie.  Enjoy! Too Many Books I have books upon the windowsills and books piled up on chairs. Books stacked high in corners and books upon the stairs. I have books packed tight on bookshelves and on top of them more books. Books piled high on nightstands and almost everywhere you looks. […]


LitStack Review: Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

Six of Crows Leigh Bardugo Henry Holt and Company Release Date:  September 29, 2015 ISBN 978-1-62779-212-7 For many years, I have had a favorite rapscallion literary character of ill repute:  Jack Dawkins, better known as the Artful Dodger in Charles Dickens’ classic, Oliver Twist.  But now, the Dodger has some mighty strong competition:  Kaz Brekker, […]

Six of Crows

Finalists for the Bram Stoker Awards Announced

This week the Horror Writers Association (HWA), the premier organization of writers and publishers of horror and dark fantasy, announced the nominees for the 2015 Bram Stoker Awards.  The awards, named after the author of the horror masterpiece, Dracula, are given annually to works that exhibit superior writing in the horror genre. The nominees include: […]


2015 Kitschie Awards Shortlist Announced

The Kitschie Awards, now it their sixth year, rewards the year’s “most progressive, intelligent and entertaining works that contain elements of the speculative or fantastic.”  They are sponsored by Fallen London, the award-winning browser game of a dark and mysterious London, designed by Failbetter Games. This year’s shortlist for “the most tentacular of all literary […]


Tiptree Award Looking for Reader Input

The James Tiptree, Jr. Literary Award is an annual award an annual literary prize for science fiction or fantasy that expands or explores our understanding of gender.  According to the Award’s website, “he aim of the award is not to look for work that falls into some narrow definition of political correctness, but rather to […]

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2015 Nebula Awards Nominees Announced

The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) have announced the nominees for the 2015 Nebula Awards, as well as the nominees for the Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation and the Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy. According to the SFWA’s eligibility rules, all works first published in […]



Today we are sharing the cover for BENNETT (On the Line, #2) by Brenda Rothert. This book is currently up for pre-order and will be released on March 15th! KILLIAN, the first book in the On the Line series, also has brand new cover.

You can purchase the book by clicking the links below.



Bennett (On the Line, #2)

Releasing: March 15


Amazon | iBooks

Add Bennett to Goodreads

Book Blurb:

Bennett Morse devotes his time to chasing two things: an NHL career and women. He’s the easygoing member of his three-man line on the Fenway Flyers, content to play the game he loves and soak up the female attention it brings – as long as it’s from a different woman each time. He learned the hard way that choosing only one leads to heartache.

Newly single attorney Charlotte Holloway finds just what she needs in Bennett – a sweet, sexy man to ease the burn of her recent breakup. One night is all she wants from the left winger who seems to have all the right moves. Soon circumstance draws her back to Bennett, and the sparks between them become a fiery blaze. But with the stakes high, will they risk it all and put their hearts on the line?


Killian, the first book in the Out of Line series, had a make-over!


Killian (On the Line, #1)


Amazon | iBooks | B&N | Kobo | GooglePlay

Add Killian to Goodreads

Book Blurb:

Killian Bosch knows he’s his own worst enemy – he just doesn’t give a damn. The star forward of a minor league hockey team, he’s unstoppable on the ice. His reckless behavior, devil-may-care attitude and complete disregard for consequences have made him a major source of headaches for the Fenway Flyers’ brass.

But the new Flyers owner is more steel than brass. Sidney Stahl is a disciplined woman who parlayed earnings from a college job into a real estate empire. She’s determined to transform the Flyers from marketing nightmare to hockey powerhouse. Once she gets Killian in line, she knows the rest of the team will follow his lead.

The seduction of his sexy new team owner is a challenge too forbidden for Killian to resist. Sidney plays into his attraction as a means of controlling him, but soon finds that she’s the one surrendering. It’s all on the line as Killian and Sidney are forced to choose – business or pleasure?




Brenda Rothert is an Illinois native who was a print journalist for nine years. She made the jump from fact to fiction in 2013 and never looked back. From new adult to steamy contemporary romance, Brenda creates fresh characters in every story she tells. She’s a lover of Diet Coke, chocolate, lazy weekends and happily ever afters.


Website | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | | Wattpad | Amazon

InkSlinger Blogger Final

Our thoughts and prayers are with the family, friends and fans of American novelist, Harper Lee who passed away at the age of 89. HARPER LEE

On July 11, 1960, Lee’s novel To Kill A Mockingbird was published and garnered critical and commercial success. Last year, a prequel to Mockingbird, Go Set a Watchman was published after being discovered in 2011 and was regarded as one of the year’s best selling books.

During her career and fiercely private life, Lee received an honorary doctorate of letters from The University Of The South in Sewanee, Tenn, a Pulitzer Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the National Medal of Arts, presented to her by President Barack Obama, in 2010.


2015 Aurealis Awards Finalists Announced

Americans have the Nebula Awards.  The Brits have the BSFA Awards.  And the Australians have the Aurealis Awards. Aurealis is an Australian speculative fiction magazine, launched in 1990 to provide a market for Australian speculative fiction writers, and with a further aim to raise authors’ public profiles; they instituted the Aurealis Awards in 1995.  New […]


Compton Crook Award Finalists Announced

The Baltimore Science Fiction Society, Inc. (BSFS) created the Compton Crook Award in 1982 to honor the best first novel of the year written by an individual author in the Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror genre.   This year, the nominees for the 2016 Compton Crook Award are: 5 to 1 by Holly Bodger Owl and the Japanese Circus […]


Vote For Your Favorite Locus Award Nominees

Along with the Hugos and the Nebulas, the Locus Awards are some of the biggest awards handed out for works in the science fiction and fantasy genres.  But did you know that you can vote for your favorite nominees without belonging to any organization or attending any convention?  Well, you can! Locus Online has posted the […]


LitStack Rec: The Films in My Life & Planetfall

The Films in My Life, by Francois Truffaut This past week, Francois Truffaut would have turned 84. The revered French filmmaker, who died in 1984 is the subject of numerous books,  dearth of books that cover the director’s life and work, but few directors step into the role of critic. Truffaut, one of the founders […]


2015 BSFA Shortlist Announced

This weekend, The British Science Fiction Association announced their shortlist for the 2015 BSFA Awards – the premiere British science fiction literary awards.  The nominees include:   Best Novel: Europe at Midnight by Dave Hutchinson Mother of Eden by Chris Beckett The House of Shattered Wings by Aliette de Bodard Luna: New Moon by Ian […]


The People’s Choice Awards for Books Are Announced

The results are in, and the winners have been announced for the first annual People’s Choice Awards for Books (sponsored by the People’s Choice Awards and!  And the voters’ favorite books are: Favorite Fiction – The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah Favorite Nonfiction – Why Not Me? Mindy Kaling Favorite Crime & Mystery – Pretty […]

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Gimbling in the Wabe – The View from Here

Recently, there was a bit of hullabaloo and a great deal of chortling when rapper B.o.B. “dueled” over Twitter with astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson about the Earth being flat.  I had heard about it only tangentially until Tyson did a bit on Comedy Central’s The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore, as the first responder in […]


“A Darker Shade of Magic” Rights Acquired

After “sitting on the news for over six months”, author Victoria Schwab excitedly announced on Facebook on Tuesday that the rights to her critically acclaimed fantasy novel A Darker Shade of Magic have been picked up by G-BASE, an entertainment development company partially owned by actor Gerard Butler.  “And I am writing the pilot!!!!!” she […]


LitStack Rec: Bridge & A Tale for the Time Being

Bridge, by Robert Thomas “Welcome to the prayer-strewn pews of my brain,” Alice, the narrator of Bridge tells us, and quickly, we understand that this intellectually gifted young woman sees the world, and herself, in unconventional, and often dangerous ways. Robert Thomas’s powerful debut novel, published by BOA Editions in October, takes place in fifty-six […]

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“The Sorcerer of the Wildeeps” Wins the Crawford Award

Kai Ashante Wilson has won the 2016 William L. Crawford Fantasy Award for his debut novel The Sorcerer of the Wildeeps. The Crawford Award is presented annually by the International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts (IAFA), a scholarly organization devoted to the study of the fantastic as it appears in literature, film, and […]

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A Month of Letters Challenge

So, when I took the parcel I was going to send out for the first day of the 2016 A Month of Letters Challenge to the local post office, I was the 10th or 11th person in line.  There was only one person working at the counter, and she was off in the back looking […]


Gimbling in the Wabe – In Praise of Letters

I promise, I won’t make this a diatribe on the lack of personalization in society today, nor will I bemoan the loss of the art of letter writing, or even shed a tear at the passing of cursive writing.  That’s something my grandmother would do, and even though I loved her dearly, I don’t want […]

A Month of Letters Challenge

J. K. Rowling, Michael Pietsch to receive PEN American Center Awards

The PEN American Center has announced that author J. K. Rowling has been named as the recipient of the 2016 PEN/Allen Foundation Literary Service Award “for the extraordinary inspiration her books have provided to generations of readers and writers worldwide.” Of the award, PEN President Andrew Solomon wrote: “Through her writing, Rowling engenders imagination, empathy, humor, […]

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Have you ever watched The People’s Choice Awards, rooting for your favorite movie or television show, and wondered, “Why isn’t there a People’s Choice Award for books?”  Sure, there are lots of literary awards for “the best”, but how about an award for a book simply because we really liked reading it?

Well, now there is!

The People’s Choice Awards have teamed up with respected literary website The Reading Room to launch the first ever Favorite Books 2016, and you can be part of the process!  Five books have been nominated in each of six categories (Fiction, Nonfiction, Crime & Mystery, Young Adult, Fantasy, and Romance).  All that left now is for you to vote!

But you have to do it quickly – voting ends on January 28, 2016.  That’s only two days!

So what are you waiting for?  Click on the link and vote!


Blog Tour & Giveaway: Extreme Honor by Piper J. Drake

  EXTREME HONOR by Piper J. Drake (January 26, 2016; Forever Mass Market; True Heroes #1) HONOR, LOYALTY, LOVE David Cruz is good at two things: war and training dogs. The ex-soldier’s toughest case is Atlas, a Belgian Malinois whose handler died in combat. Nobody at Hope’s Crossing kennel can break through the animal’s grief. […]


LitStack Review: Uprooted by Naomi Novik

Uprooted Naomi Novik Del Rey First Edition:  May 19, 2015 ISBN 978-0-8041-7904-1 Agnieszka is a girl who lives in a quiet village in a green valley.  She is sweet natured, and indistinguishable from the other children save for the fact that she always seems to be disheveled and dirty, constantly spattered with mud or with […]

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Gimbling in the Wabe – Winter and Reading

The bulk of this Gimbling in the Wabe came from one I had posted three years ago; it’s also, I think, my favorite “winter” installment of this feature.  So, since I’m running short of time and inspiration this week, I thought I would run it again, albeit with a bit of adjustment from the original.  […]

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2016 Edgar Awards Nominees Announced

The Mystery Writers of America announced the finalists for their 2016 Edgar Awards on January 19.  The nominees include: BEST NOVEL The Strangler Vine by M.J. Carter The Lady From Zagreb by Philip Kerr Life or Death by Michael Robotham Let Me Die in His Footsteps by Lori Roy Canary by Duane Swierczynski Night Life […]

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LitStack Recs: Stoner & Speak Easy

Stoner, by John Williams John Williams’ 1965 novel went out of print after selling only 2,000 copies, but since its re-release by Vintage in 1995, this novel of a Midwestern academic’s insular life has appeared on bestseller lists in Europe and Israel and sold over 100,000 copies. Stoner seems at first an unlikely candidate for […]


National Book Critics Circle Finalists Announced

The National Book Critics Circle has announced the finalists for their 2015 awards, as well as the recipients of three annual awards. Take a look! AUTOBIOGRAPHY The Light of the World by Elizabeth Alexander The Odd Woman and the City by Vivian Gornick Bettyville by George Hodgman Negroland by Margo Jefferson H is for Hawk […]


Newbery, Caldecott and Other Youth Literature Awards Announced

On Monday, January 11, the American Library Association (ALA) announced the top books, video and audio books for children and young adults for 2016 at its Midwinter Meeting & Exhibits in Boston.  The list of award winners include: John Newbery Medal (for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature) – Last Stop on Market Street, […]

Last Stop on Market Street and Finding Winnie

LitStack Rec: Examinations of Hitchock & Fangirl

A Definitive study of Alfred Hitchcock, by Francois Truffaut, trans. by Helen Scott (1966) & Hitchcock/Truffaut, a documentary film by Kent Jones (2015) Before he began directing, Francois Truffaut was a film critic, and before that, a voracious viewer of films. A director and a founder’s of the French cinema’s New Wave began his movie […]


LitStack Review: Archivist Wasp by Nicole Kornher-Stace

Archivist Wasp Nicole Kornher-Stace Big Mouth House Publishing Release Date:  May 5, 2015 ISBN 978-1-61873-097-8 Wasp isn’t her real name.  But it’s the one given her by the Catchkeep-priest, who oversees all the girls who serve in the goddess Catchkeep’s name, upstart and Archivist alike.  He gave her the name, because it fit and because […]

Archivist Wasp

LitStack Review: Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith

Career of Evil Robert Galbraith Mulholland Books Release Date:  October 20, 2015 ISBN 978-0-316-34993-2 Career of Evil, the third book in the crime thriller series starring private detective Cormoran Strike, is the grittiest one yet.  It’s no wonder that author J.K. Rowling stuck to her non de plume of Robert Galbraith long after news of […]

Career of Evil

Blog Tour: Crimson Cove by Eden Butler

Title: Crimson Cove Author: Eden Butler Genre: Paranormal Romance Release Date: December 31, 2015 Tour Hosted by: As the Pages Turn Synopsis Ten years ago Janiver stole a kiss from the meanest boy in school. He never forgot. Senior year. One minute before the tardy bell rang, Bane Illes would slip through the door. He […]


LitStack Review: Fishing With RayAnne by Ava Finch

Fishing With RayAnne Ava Finch Lake Union Publishing Release Date:  November 3, 2015 ISBN 978-15-0-39476-89 At first glance, RayAnne Dahl is a typical native 30-something Minnesotan.  She loves the changing of the seasons, embraces winter (even the driving), wears Scandinavian sweaters with “armorlike pewter closures and hasps”, and loves the outdoors.  She especially loves fishing, […]

Sarah Stonich

Release Day Blitz and Giveaway: Crimson Cove by Eden Butler

Title: Crimson Cove Author: Eden Butler Genre: Paranormal Romance Release Date: December 31, 2015 Synopsis Ten years ago Janiver stole a kiss from the meanest boy in school. He never forgot. Senior year. One minute before the tardy bell rang, Bane Illes would slip through the door. He never smiled. He never spoke. Each day, […]


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Here’s your chance for one copy each of USA Today Bestselling author Willow Aster’s In the Fields & True Love Story.

Comment below to qualify. Two winners will win an e-book copy of each title.

In the Fieldsin the fields
Willow Aster

1971—In the tiny, backward town of Tulma, Tennessee, optimistic, bookish Caroline Carson unwittingly finds herself in the middle of a forbidden romance. Severely neglected by her family and forced to flee Tulma to protect her secrets, Caroline’s young life comes crashing down around her. She finds refuge in a new town, but the past always has a way of stretching around time and stirring up trouble.
When a new love comes into her life, she has to decide if she can give her heart to someone else, or if she will always be tied to someone she can’t have.

Willow Aster is the author of True Love Story and In the Fields, and many more to come. She loves her crazy life with her husband and kids.






True Love Storytrue love story
Willow Aster

Sparrow Fisher is transforming. No longer dressed up in antiquated clothes and ideals, she is finally trying on her freedom.

Before she moves to New York City, she meets Ian Sterling, a musician Sparrow has dreamed about since she first saw him. The attraction is instant, but their relationship isn’t so simple.

Over a five year span, Sparrow and Ian run into each other in unusual places. Each time, Sparrow has to decide if she can trust him, if he feels the same for her, and finally, if love is really enough.


12/29/15 December Giveaway: The Bliss Series Boxed Set – The Whole Damn Harem by BJ Harvey

The Bliss Series Boxed Set – The Whole Damn Harem BJ Harvey All five books in the international bestselling Bliss erotic romantic comedy series by BJ Harvey together in one super-sized boxed set. The books are interconnected standalones focusing on a group of twenty-somethings’ in Chicago. Think Sex in the City meets Friends with a […]


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The Rub Downrub down
Gina Sheldon

Luke Stratton spends his days making clients moan in pleasure. His hands hold the ability to drive a woman to the brink of ecstasy. As a rule, his professional touch is the only thing he gives any female client. Until a Boston marathon trainee seeks his services.

Bare skin

One year after the tragic Boston Marathon bombing, Alexa Williams must overcome horrible memories of that day. She struggles to put her fear aside to meet the challenge of the run. A rigorous training schedule leaves her body aching, and with Luke’s help, Alexa finds soothing release at The Rub Down.

Healing Hands

Will Luke hold onto his rules and let Alexa go, or will they be able to cross the finish line together?





12/22/15 December Giveaway: Eden Butler E-book Bundle

Here’s your chance to pick up one of TWO e-book bundles by Eden Butler, including the Serenity series, the Thin Love series or the Shadows and Lies series. Two winners will win ALL e-books in EACH series. THE SERENITY SERIES: Chasing Serenity Graduate student Autumn McShane has had her share of heartbreak. She’s been abandoned […]


dec giveSparrows for Freesparrows
Lila Felix

There are skeletons in every closet. Some stay quiet—and some rule your soul with an iron fist.

Ezra is ruled by the ghosts of his past—and needled by the guilt they create. Not only does he have to manage his own guilt—his friends are forced to bear the weight as well. He lives in limbo, never dreaming of anything that lies beyond the grave.
In his mind, he’s a murderer, pure and simple.

Hide and seek is Aysa’s game. She begs for small spaces and empty places. But, she secretly desires so much more.
When they find each other, a hope for something new is sprung.
But Ezra’s skeletons are out for blood.

“I hide shock well. I’m a pro at hiding. I have no idea that whatever he had to tell me would be so personal—so heartbreaking. But, I quickly remembered that heartbreak was all around him every time he turned around. He needs no more empathy or sympathy in his life. He craves someone to give him a different take on a tired situation.
And different is practically my middle name.”




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Here’s your chance for one copy each of NYT best selling author Penelope Douglas’ brand new releases Misconduct and Corrupt.

Comment below to qualify. Two winners will win an e-book copy of each title.



I was told that dreams were our heart’s desires. My nightmares, however, became my obsession.

His name is Michael Crist.

My boyfriend’s older brother is like that scary movie that you peek through your hand to watch. He is handsome, strong, and completely terrifying. The star of his college’s basketball team and now gone pro, he’s more concerned with the dirt on his shoe than me.

But I noticed him.

I saw him. I heard him. The things that he did, and the deeds that he hid…For years, I bit my nails, unable to look away.

Now, I’ve graduated high school and moved on to college, but I haven’t stopped watching Michael. He’s bad, and the dirt I’ve seen isn’t content to stay in my head anymore.

Because he’s finally noticed me.


Her name is Erika Fane, but everyone calls her Rika.

My brother’s girlfriend grew up hanging around my house and is always at our dinner table. She looks down when I enter a room and stills when I am close. I can always feel the fear rolling off of her, and while I haven’t had her body, I know that I have her mind. That’s all I really want anyway.

Until my brother leaves for the military, and I find Rika alone at college.

In my city.


The opportunity is too good to be true as well as the timing. Because you see, three years ago she put a few of my high school friends in prison, and now they’re out.

We’ve waited. We’ve been patient. And now every last one of her nightmares will come true.

***Corrupt is a stand-alone dark romance with no Cliffy***



From the New York Times bestselling author of the Fall Away series who never fails to deliver a “powerfully written contemporary love story…”*

Former tennis player Easton Bradbury is trying to be the best teacher she can be, trying to reach her bored students and trying to forget her past. What brought her to this stage in her life isn’t important. She can’t let it be. But now one parent-teacher meeting may be her undoing…

Meeting Tyler Marek for the first time makes it easy for Easton to see why his son is having trouble in school. The man knows how to manage businesses and wealth, not a teenage boy. Or a young teacher, for that matter, though he tries to. And yet…there is something about him that draws Easton in—a hint of vulnerability, a flash of attraction, a spark that might burn.

Wanting him is taboo. Needing him is undeniable. And his long-awaited touch will weaken Easton’s resolve—and reveal what should stay hidden…


Gimbling in the Wabe – My Gift to You

I’ve posted this before, but it bears repeating, especially at this time of year. My father was a minister, and one of my fondest childhood memories was watching him conduct Christmas Eve services.  In lieu of a sermon, he often would read a story that would touch our hearts. This was one of his favorites […]

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Seeking Havokseeking
Lila Felix

Her life is just as messed up as her name.

All she wanted was a friend—one that knew her and not her circumstances. She needed somewhere to call home. Hers was an open door for countless men looking for the services her mother offered them. She camouflaged herself against lockers and blackboards to avoid the stares and whispers at school.

And then she found Cal…and Fade.

Cal lives like Frankenstein, rising at night to work and just trying to make it until dawn. He avoids most relationships, afraid of the things he will be asked to do. He moonlights as Fade, a radio station DJ who spends hours counseling his peers on their troubles. It was all mundane until Jocelyn called the station.

Cal and Havok pursue a friendship.

Jocelyn and Fade pursue a relationship beyond the confines of the radio waves.

But when Havok disappears, Cal will find that Havok has been guarding a lifetime worth of secrets. And when Fade and Jocelyn’s all night phone conversations cease, he finds a link between them he never saw coming.



LitStack Recs: Without & Winterdance

Without Donald Hall This book is the only one that when picked up, is read from first page to last—no matter what I was doing before, or what time of day or night. In twenty poems, the poet Donald Hall traces the illness and death of his wife, the American poet and translator Jane Kenyon. […]


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The Moondust Sonatas: Movement No. 1, a Hunters Moonmoondust
Alan Osi
Cleveland Writers Press

A drug that lets you see God. Imagine the possibilities Percival, a young Brooklyn DJ, awakens from a night of debauchery with clear instructions on how to produce moondust. He discovers that this mysterious grey powder provides the ultimate high and gives users a glimpse of the divine. After months of quietly selling it to artists, however, Percival attracts deadly attention from a gang of drug dealers. Facing threats from all sides, he decides to go public with its secrets, although to do so he must risk his both his freedom and his life. The danger he faces pales in comparison to that caused by moondust. In a world that’s a tinderbox of smoldering conflict, moondust could be the match that ignites a global cataclysm. An edge-of-your-seat thriller, Movement #1: A Hunter’s Moon,” the first volume of the The Moondust Sonatas takes readers on a wild ride through the underside of the city, the birth of a remarkable new drug, and an impending drug war while raising provocative questions about spirituality and what we’re really craving.”


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Haunting Investigation haunting
Chelsea Quinn Yarbro
(Historical Mystery/Ghost Story)
Cleveland Writers Press

Spring 1924. The world has clawed its way back from the ravages of WWI and the Spanish Flu pandemic. The 20’s are beginning to roar. Poppy Thornton lives with her Aunt Jo and her excitable cat Maestro in upper-crust Philadelphia. Poppy is determined to make a name for herself as a serious crime reporter, but is stuck reporting on garden parties and ladies’ fashion. Then one day her editor assigns her to collect background information on the suicide of a prominent businessman. She soon discovers it was actually a murder but her surprising source for this information is the ghost of a man killed alongside her father during the Great War. Even if she dared tell anyone, who would believe it? Together Poppy and her “gentleman haunt” follow the trail of a string of murders. But as their investigation narrows in on an all-too-familiar suspect, Poppy becomes a target herself and wonders if her ghost of a partner will appear in time to keep her from joining him in the after-life.”



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Blue Voyageblue voyage
Diana Renn
(YA) Viking

Zan is a politician’s daughter and an adrenaline junkie. Whether she’s rock climbing or shoplifting, she loves to live on the edge. But she gets more of a rush than she bargained for on a forced mother–daughter bonding trip to Turkey, where she finds herself in the crosshairs of an antiquities smuggling ring. These criminals believe that Zan can lead them to an ancient treasure that’s both priceless and cursed. Until she does so, she and her family are in grave danger. Zan’s quest to save the treasure—and the lives of people she cares about—leads her from the sparkling Mediterranean, to the bustle of Istanbul’s Grand Bazaar, to the eerie and crumbling caves of Cappadocia. But it seems that nowhere is safe, and there’s only so high she can climb before everything comes tumbling down.



LitStack Review: Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson

Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things Jenny Lawson Flatiron Books Release Date:  September 22, 2015 ISBN 978-1-250-07700-4 Jenny Lawson is the woman behind The Bloggess website, which has won numerous awards for its brilliant writing and its biting humor.  She herself says of the site, “It’s mainly dark humor mixed with brutally honest […]


LitStack Rec: Brooklyn and Viva Frida

Brooklyn, by Colm Toibin Toibin’s 2009 novel, which won that year’s Costa Award, is a lovely and haunting story set in 1950s Dublin and New York. It tells of Eilis Lacey, born and raised in Enniscorthy, in Ireland’s County Wexford, and her immigration to the United States as a young woman. Her well-meaning sister, Rose, […]


The Cuban Connection
ML Malcolmcuban

Set in New York and Havana during 1960, The Cuban Connection introduces ace reporter Katherine O’Connor, who has a nose for news and an inclination to use it in very dangerous places. Working undercover in Castro’s Cuba, she gets a little too up-close-and-personal with Castro’s thugs, a priest who may be working for the CIA, and a little boy whose survival is mysteriously linked to the welfare of Katherine’s own mother-not to mention falling for a man who may be a Soviet spy. The Cuban Connection incorporates actual historical events into a page-turning tale that is by turns riveting, poignant, and hilarious-not unlike Katherine O’Connor herself. M.L. Malcolm is the author of two previous novels, Heart of Lies and Heart of Deception, both published by Harper Collins.




THROTTLEHere’s your chance to pick up the entire Men of Inked series from Chelle Bliss.

Follow the Gallo family as they navigate the irresistible perils of love and life.

We’re giving away ONE e-book set of the entire Men of Inked series which includes the following:










    Author: J.D. Hollyfield Release Date: January 2016 Find on it Goodreads Synopsis: Fake it till you make it. That’s Lexi Hall, the wild socialite’s motto for how to live life. Single and allergic to commitment, Lexi is having the time of her life. Or is she? With a new promotion at the art […]

faking it

dec giveDeadly Lullaby by Robert McCluredeadly

Fresh off a nine-year stint in San Quentin, career hitman Babe Crucci plans to finally go straight and enjoy all life has to offer—after he pulls one or two more jobs to shore up his retirement fund. More than anything, Babe is dead set on making up for lost time with his estranged son, Leo, who just so happens to be a rising star in the LAPD.

The road to reconciliation starts with tickets to a Dodgers game. But first, Leo needs a little help settling a beef over some gambling debts owed to a local mobster. This kind of thing is child’s play for Babe–until a sudden twist in the negotiations leads to a string of corpses and a titanic power shift in gangland politics. With the sins of his father piling up and dragging him down, Leo throws himself into the investigation of a young prostitute’s murder, a case that makes him some unlikely friends—and some brutally unpredictable enemies.

Caught up in a clash of crime lords, weaving past thugs with flamethrowers who expend lives like pocket change, Babe and Leo have one last chance to face the ghosts of their past—if they want to live long enough to see their future.



LitStack Rec: Bird Cloud: A Memoir of Place & Moon Girl

Bird Cloud: A Memoir of Place, by Annie Proulx The memoir by this award-winning novelist (The Shipping News) and story writer (“Brokeback Mountain,” from Wyoming Stories) centers on the experience of building a home in the titular tract of Montana wilderness—a place, and a house, Proulx comes to love. We learn of the house she builds […]

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Goodreads Choice Awards 2015 Announced

The results of the voting are in, and the Goodreads Choice Awards for 2015 have been announced! Although this is one of the most “popularity contest” awards – determined by votes of Goodreads members – it’s still a fun barometer of what can be considered a reader’s list of the best of the best.  Over […]


dec giveFires of Invention by J. Scott SavageCOVE

Trenton Colman is a creative thirteen-year-old boy with a knack for all things mechanical. But his talents are viewed with suspicion in Cove, a steam-powered city built inside a mountain. In Cove, creativity is a crime and “invention” is a curse word.

Kallista Babbage is a repair technician and daughter of the notorious Leo Babbage, whose father died in an explosion—an event the leaders of Cove point to as an example of the danger of creativity.

Working together, Trenton and Kallista learn that Leo Babbage was developing a secret project before he perished. Following clues he left behind, they begin to assemble a strange machine that is unlike anything they’ve ever seen before. They soon discover that what they are building may threaten every truth their city is founded on—and quite possibly their very lives.



12/1/15 December Giveaway: Slavemakers by Joseph Wallace

Slavemakers by  Joseph Wallace Twenty years ago, venomous parasitic wasps known as “thieves” staged a massive, apocalyptic attack on another species—Homo sapiens—putting them on the brink of extinction. But some humans did survive. The colony called Refugia is home to a population of 281, including scientists, a pilot, and a tough young woman named Kait. […]


NaNoWriMo Progress Report – Week Four

*  Week Four – I Win!  * Yup, I did it!  I crossed the 50,000 word finish line in NaNoWriMo the day after Thanksgiving, and went from being a Participant to being a Winner! At first I was confused when I read about “winning” NaNoWriMo.  I thought, “It’s not supposed to be a competition, is […]


American Writers’ Museum Announces Location

Ah, Chicago!  The Windy City!  City of Big Shoulders!  Millennium Park and the “Bean”!  The Art Institute, Adler Planetarium, Shedd Aquarium, the Field Museum!  Navy Pier and the Magnificent Mile! And soon – the American Writers Museum! It was recently announced that the proposed American Writers Museum has leased space at 180 North Michigan Avenue […]


NaNoWriMo Progress Report – Week Three

*  Week Three – Almost There!  *   It’s the third week of my inaugural NaNoWriMo experience, and I’m ecstatic to report that I finished the week with a 49,060 word count – only 940 words away from the 50,000 word “winning” target!  (I actually paused in my writing at this point, as I knew […]


Cover Reveal: Enshrine by Chelle Bliss

Title: Enshrine Author: Chelle Bliss STANDALONE Release Date: January 2016 Cover Photo: Eric Battershell Photography Cover Models: Ani Saliasi & Anna Medvedeva Synopsis: EVERYTHING CHANGED IN AN INSTANT. I thought I knew what was important, but one phone call sent my life into a tailspin. Alone and afraid, I clung to the one man I […]


2015 National Book Award Winners Announced

On Wednesday night, the National Book Award winners were announced at a gala celebration in New York City.  Without further ado, here were the results: FICTION WINNER: Fortune Smiles by Adam Johnson Refund by Karen E. Bender The Turner House by Angela Flournoy Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara […]

Havanas in Camelot: Personal Essays, by William Styron

Though William Styron is best know for his novels (The Confessions of Nat Turner, Sophie’s Choice), and a late memoir chronicling his depression (Darkness Visible: A Memoir of Madness), he wrote wonderful essays that draw on his power of insight, intellectual acuity, and deeply felt experience of the world, all couched in the same gorgeous sentences that define his fiction. This makes sense, after all. Styron’s forays into the consciousness of a character like Sophie Zawistowska are the same he trains on himself.

The title essay is a reference to the cigars favored by John Kennedy, and recounts a White House state dinner that Styron (who died in 2006) and other prominent writers attended to honor the recent Nobel Prize winners. It was April, 1962 and the President and First Lady  were at the height of their influence and glamour.

The title’s non-ironic allusion to the Arthurian court lends the essay, and all the essays in this collection, a sense of the past seen with a yearning backward glance. “The past is never dead. It’s not even past,” Faulkner said, and with Styron, you get the sense that the glittering as well as the duller episodes take on a lovely sheen when viewed in hindsight.

Here’s Styron on the Kennedy state dinner, as the President and First Lady arrive to receive their guests:

…Jack and Jackie actually shimmered. You have had to be abnormal, perhaps psychotic, to be immune to their dumbfounding appeal. Even Republicans were gaga. They were truly a golden couple, and I am not trying to downplay my own sense of wonder when note that a number of the guests, male and female, appeared so affected by the glamour that their eyes took on a goofy, catatonic gaze.

An aspect of Styron’s voice that has always appealed to me is what I can only describe as a generational drift. I hear in his use of vernacular, his reverence for heroes and distrust of power, a tone that resembles my father’s. Both share a Greatest Generation-inflected style that to some may sound dated, but to this reader’s ear is a comfort, and brings nostalgic passage to an era of mid-century men whose rebellion was rooted in their artistic natures. Like Frank Wheeler in Richard Yates’ Revolutionary Road, it’s a generation who went to war, and against the grain of their time, broke the conformist mode with a devotion to art, not commerce.

Among my favorites here is “A Case of the Great Pox.” It recounts a stay in a military infirmary after Styron was diagnosed with syphilis. He served in the Marine Corps during World War Two, and before basic training ended, was on a ward at the Navel Hospital in Parris Island, South Carolina, otherwise known as The Clap Shack.

The piece encompasses the best of the personal essay form. It combines personal and political history, informative detail (in this case, a history of STDs), and a sharply structured plot that takes us with Styron on the various stages of his syphilitic journey.

Voltaire never let the horrid nature of the illness obtrude upon his own lighthearted view of it—he wrote wittily about the great pox in Candide—and throughout Casanova’s memoirs there are anecdotes about syphilis that the author plainly regards as excruciatingly funny. Making sport of it may have been the only way in which the offspring  of the Enlightenment could come to grips with a pestilence that seemed as immutably fixed in history as war or famine.

The fourteen essays in the slim but affecting collection are astute and readable, and cover such topics as the author’s longtime rivalry with his peer Truman Capote, an early experience with publishing and the censorship of the 1950s; his beloved Vineyard Haven in Martha’s Vineyard.

Mostly I love the soft collision here of harbor and shore, the subtly haunting briny quality that all small towns have when they are situated on the sea. It is often manifested simply in the sounds of the place—sounds unknown to forlorn inland municipalities…these sounds might appear distracting, but as a fussy, easily distracted person who has written three large books within earshot of these sounds, I an affirm that they do not annoy at all.

You could sit down with this book mid-afternoon and consume it by nightfall. It will go too quickly, I guarantee, and require that you start from the beginning and read it again.

—Lauren Alwan

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Costa Book Awards Shortlist Announced

The Costa Book Awards are a set of annual literary awards recognizing English-language books by writers based in Britain and Ireland.  The awards, which have been handed out since 1972, are given both for high literary merit but also for works that are enjoyable reading and whose aim is to convey the enjoyment of reading […]

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EXTREME HONOR by Piper J. Drakeextreme
True Heroes Series #1
January 26, 2015; Forever Mass Market;

David Cruz is good at two things: war and training dogs. The ex-soldier’s toughest case is Atlas, a Belgian Malinois whose handler died in combat. Nobody at Hope’s Crossing kennel can break through the animal’s grief. That is, until dog whisperer Evelyn Jones walks into the facility…and into Atlas’s heart. David hates to admit that the curvy blonde’s mesmerizing effect isn’t limited to canines. But when Lyn’s work with Atlas puts her in danger, David will do anything to protect her.

Lyn realizes that David’s own battle scars make him uniquely qualified for his job as a trainer. Tough as nails yet gentle when it counts, he’s gotten closer to Atlas than anyone else—and he’s willing to put his hard-wired suspicion aside to let her do the same. But someone desperate enough to kill doesn’t want Lyn working with Atlas. Now only teamwork, trust, and courage can save two troubled hearts and the dog who loves them both…

Pre-order the book!

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Coming soon! True Heroes Series #2, Ultimate Courageultimate

Release: July 26, 2015; Forever Mass Market

Elisa Hall is good at starting from scratch. Leaving an abusive relationship in her rearview, she packs everything she owns into the trunk of her car and heads for refuge with her friend in Hope’s Crossing, North Carolina.

Alex Rojas returned from his second deployment as a Navy SEAL to find his condo empty and divorce papers on the breakfast table. Now he’s building a life for himself and his daughter at Hope’s Crossing kennels training younger dogs and handlers to search and rescue, struggling to adjust to life back in the States and as a single father.

When Elisa shows up at the kennels, it’s obvious she’s running from something. Luckily, the dogs and trainers at Hope’s Crossing are more than capable of warding off trouble. And with every minute he spends with Elisa, Alex becomes even more and more determined to protect the woman he’s certain he won’t be able to live without…

Pre-order the book!

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About the author:piper

Piper J. Drake (or “PJ”) spent her childhood pretending to study for the SATs by reading every interesting novel she could find at the library. After being introduced to the wonderful world of romance by her best friend, she dove into the genre. PJ began her writing career as PJ Schnyder, writing sci-fi & paranormal romance and steampunk, for which she won the FF&P PRISM award as well as the NJRW Golden Leaf award and Parsec award. PJ’s romantic suspense novels incorporate her interests in mixed martial arts and the military. The True Heroes series is inspired by her experience rescuing, owning and training a variety of retired working dogs, including Kaiser, a former guard dog, and Mozart, who was trained to detect explosives.

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Oxford Dictionaries’ Word of the Year

The venerated Oxford Dictionaries group has announced its Word of the Year for 2015, and that word is… not a word!  For the first time ever in its history, the Oxford Dictionary (actually, “Dictionaries” but that just sounds wrong) has honored a pictograph as its Word of the Year – specifically the “face with tears […]


Goodreads Choice Awards Voting Happening NOW

Are you a member of Goodreads, or been thinking of joining this “social cataloging” website for book lovers and those who love to read?  If you answered YES to either of these questions, then you need to head on over to the Goodreads site to vote for your favorite books in the annual Goodreads Choice […]


NaNoWriMo Progress Report – Week Two

*  Week Two, The Grind  * So we’re two weeks into the National Novel Writing Month, halfway there, and “everyone” said that this would probably be the hardest week.  The shine and enthusiasm of beginning would have worn off, the flush of excitement at tackling a dream would have given way to the grind of […]


‘Tis the Season – for Best Books Lists

It’s time for the start of the Best Books of the Year lists, especially if those lists are being compiled by retailers who are looking to entice consumers to add books as gifts under the tree (as if we needed any urging to do that, am I right?).  And yes, we know this is free […]

Amazon best lists 2015

2015 World Fantasy Award Winners Announced

The winners of the 2015 World Fantasy Awards were announced Sunday night in Sarasota, New York at the annual World Fantasy Convention.  So let’s get right to the winners! NOVEL WINNER: The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison City of Stairs by Robert Jackson Bennett, Area X: The Southern Reach Trilogy […]

Sam Araya

NaNoWriMo Progress Report

* Week One, the Learning Curve * According to the metrics on the NaNoWriMo website, aspiring authors must pen the equivalent of 1,667 words every day during the month of November to attain the 50,000 word minimum.  Every.  Single. Day. So.  Week One is in the books.  And how have I done?  Good.  Really good.  […]


giftsA Time of Gifts: On Foot to Constantinople, by Patrick Leigh Fermor

A classic of the travel memoir genre, A Time of Gifts is Patrick Leigh Fermor’s account of his trek by foot from the Netherlands to Turkey in 1933-34. Though, famously, Fermor didn’t actually write the book until decades later. Published in 1977, A Time of Gifts comprises the first of what would be a three-volume memoir. Described by The Guardian as “one of the most romantic books of the twentieth century,” A Time of Gifts is perhaps the best known installment, and tracks the initial leg of the journey made when Fermor was not yet eighteen. The plan was to take little else but his knowledge of history, languages (including Greek), a book of Homer’s Odes and a few letters of introduction. Fermor, who died in 2011 at the age of ninety-six, was famously peripatetic, described in his NYT obit as “a cross between Indiana Jones, James Bond and Graham Greene.” Like Hemingway, he had a similar penchant for life abroad and fighting in foreign wars, but the prose style of the two men is poles apart.

Fermor in Greece, 1946.

As Nosey Parker writes in the Toronto Sun, Fermor’s “near-eidetic” memory enabled the memories to steep. Parker compares a journal entry from Fermor’s teenaged years to its published counterpart written forty years later (the real-time entry comes first in italics):

Bucharest amazing town … Wandered around ages, soaking it in … Lovely town.


The flatness of the Alföld leaves a stage for cloud-events at sunset that are dangerous to describe: levitated armies in deadlock and riderless squadrons descending in slow-motion to smouldering and sulphurous lagoons where barbicans  gradually collapse and fleets of burning triremes turn dark before sinking.

The decades between Fermor’s journey and the writing proved, to say the least, advantageous (a trireme, by the way, is an ancient Greek or Roman war galley with three banks of oars).

Fermor’s maximalist style may be too rich for some, especially for fans of Hemingway’s action-packed, gorgeously austere prose. Yet for readers so inclined, like Ben Downing, the rewards are vast. Here, Downing describes his experience of reading those first pages:

I stumbled across a used copy of A Time of Gifts [and] began reading straightaway, but after a few pages stopped and rubbed my eyes in disbelief. It couldn’t be this good. The narrative was captivating, the erudition vast, the comedy by turns light and uproarious, and the prose strikingly individual—at once exquisite and offhand, sweeping yet intimate, with a cadence all its own. Perhaps even more startling was the thickness of detail, and the way in which imagination infallibly brought these million specificities to life.

I count myself among those who search out “thickness of detail” in their reading. Call it a weakness, or a fixation, or maybe some inherent trait that processes experience bottom-up rather than top-down. It’s simpler to say that detail draws me in, and in the tradition of stylistically “thick” prose, I seek out writers, in fiction and nonfiction, whose detail is permeated by imagination. Given Fermor’s approach to detail, it makes perfect sense that some have designated his books a kind of “psychogeography.”

The second volume, Between the Woods and the Water, picks up in Czechoslovakia, and follows the trek further east, to the gorge where the Danube separates what is now Serbia and Romania. The final volume, assembled posthumously from Fermor’s diaries and letters, was released in 2013 as The Broken Road: Travels from Bulgaria to Mount Athos, edited by Artemis Cooper.

Read Ben Downing’s interview with Patrick Leigh Fermor in The Paris Review.

—Lauren Alwan

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It’s November! That Means It’s Time for NaNoWriMo!

It’s got a utilitarian name, a bizarre abbreviated name, and it feels kind of silly to say out loud.  But anyone who follows the writing landscape has at least heard of National Novel Writing Month – or NaNoWriMo.  Started in July 1999 with 21 participants, it now has grown to an international effort with hundreds […]


NBC to Adapt Charlaine Harris’s Midnight, Texas Series

New York, NY (October 30, 2015) – It was announced yesterday that NBC plans to adapt Charlaine Harris’s Midnight, Texas books into a drama series for the network’s fall 2016 season. The show will be written/executive produced by Monica Owusu-Breen (Lost) and executive produced by David Janollari (Six Feet Under). This is Harris’s third book […]

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LitStack Encore Review: The Coldest Girl in Coldtown by Holly Black

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown  Holly Black Little, Brown Books Release Date:  September 3, 2013 ISBN:  978-0-31621-310-3 In honor of the upcoming Halloween holiday, here is a slightly updated review of one of our favorite spooky novels.   Enjoy!   Now THIS is what a vampire tale should be like.  Forget that it’s written for […]

Coldest Girl in Coldtown

2015 British Fantasy Award Winners Announced

The winners of the 2015 British Fantasy Awards were announced on Sunday, 25 October 2015, at FantasyCon 2015, which was held in Nottingham, England.  Here is the full list of nominees and winners:   BEST FANTASY NOVEL (the Robert Holdstock Award) WINNER: Cuckoo Song, Frances Hardinge Breed by KT Davies City of Stairs by Robert […]

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The Perfume Collector
Kathleen Tessaroperfume

Last week, I loaned out my copy of Kathleen Tessaro’s lovely 2013 novel The Perfume Collector to two friends; the first one to borrow it ended up buying it for her e-reader, the other one told me that she was close to the final pages but was reading it very slowly because she just didn’t want it to end!

The novel moves effortlessly between Paris in the spring of 1955, and New York City in 1927 (and beyond). Young, Oxford-reared socialite Grace is newly married and restless in her role of supportive wife when word comes from Paris that she is the sole beneficiary of the estate of a woman she has never heard of and to whom she can determine no ties that bind. At the request of Edouard A. Tissot, Esquire, of the law firm Frank, Levin et Beaumont (who is handling the estate), she tentatively travels from her home in London, purportedly to sign the necessary papers but mainly to find out more about this mysterious inheritance which she suspects may involve a case of mistaken identity. While in Paris, and with Monsieur Tissot’s help, Grace begins to uncover bits and pieces about the intriguing recluse who has named Grace her heir.
Eva d’Orsey. Mistress to Jacques Hiver, owner of one of the most glamorous cosmetic companies in France. We meet Eva close to 30 years earlier in New York, when, at age 14, the immigrant orphan is taken on as a chambermaid at the posh Warwick Hotel in the heart of the city. At the Warwick, Eva is exposed to wealth and avarice in silks and sequins: dancers, performers, actors, gamblers, politicians, prostitutes and other hangers on, each with their own quirks and debaucheries. Quiet Eva discretely performs her duties even as she keeps track of all that is going on around her.

How the life of this guileless young hotel maid becomes entwined a generation later with a sheltered British socialite is the framework on which The Perfume Collector is drawn, and it’s a strong, engaging story. Equally compelling is author Tessaro’s ability to bring to life two cities, two eras and the personalities that fill them, with a razor sharp clarity and gentle humor that eschews sentiment while acknowledging the humanness of even the most glamorous or destitute of characters.
As the fate of the two women draws closer, we see them as separate people, one breathlessly, warily open to possibility, the other struggling to fill a well defined role in which she is uncomfortable. Yet they have their commonalities, too. Both are smart, observant, and within the confines of their worlds, unafraid to voice their opinions. Both have an extraordinary way with numbers, which will be a comfort and a bane to each in very different ways. And both are open to wonders that manifest through the senses, although they may not actively seek out those wonders, nor be able to create them.

This wonderment is beautifully articulated by the importance of perfume in the story line. While at the Hotel, Eva is assigned to service the suite of the ambiguous, aristocratic Russian master perfumer, Madame Zed, and the adjoining room of her young apprentice, the arrogant Valmont. While her relationship with the pair gets off to a rocky start, Eva grows to respect and even admire the eccentricities of Madame Zed, and Valmont discovers that he is drawn to Eva, not as a young woman but as inspiration.

Indeed, as the story progresses, the impact and mystique that perfume has played in our society continues to unfold. Madame Zed and Valmont move on and Eva later grasps an opportunity that will allow her to leave the Hotel and the life of a maid. Grace, while searching for clues to Eva’s life, stumbles across an abandoned perfumer’s shop which takes her to the Guerlain boutique on Champs-Elysees to seek clarification of what she has found. Adept both in moving the plot forward and in immersing the reader in the art and artistry found in the essence of fashion and couture, author Tessaro teaches without lecture, shares without hyperbole, and leaves the reader with an appreciation both authentic and vital.

The layered way that Kathleen Tessaro reflects the process of distilling elements of Eva’s story to recreate sensorial memories which then end up impacting Grace is very compelling. Just as disparate elements, some of which, at face value, are off-putting, rare, or crude, when combined in the proper proportion and after painstaking refinement, will create a thing of beauty, so too does Ms. Tessaro’s story take heartbreak and uncertainly – along with friendship and love – to bring forth a novel that is rare and utterly captivating.

—Sharon Browning

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Celebrating Ursula K. Le Guin

Today is Ursula K. Le Guin’s 86th birthday,  and what better day to celebrate this icon of American fiction?  Most often associated with the fantasy and science fiction genres, she has won numerous  Hugo, Nebula, Locus, and World Fantasy Awards.  Yet her works, especially those geared for younger readers, have defied labels to become some […]

Ursula K Le Guin

LitChat Interview: Sarah Younger of Nancy Yost Literary Agency

Sarah Younger has been with Nancy Yost Literary Agency since 2011, having previously been an eBook editor at Press 53. She earned a graduate degree in publishing from the University of Denver and grew up on a horse farm in North Carolina. Sarah is specifically interested in representing all varieties of Romance, some Women’s Fiction, […]


Gimbling in the Wabe – Having Fun With Stories

I had the good fortune last week of attending the first ever NerdCon: Stories, a two day convention dreamed up by “internet guy” Hank Green (half of YouTube’s popular Vlogbrothers) and author Patrick Rothfuss (The Name of the Wind, The Wise Man’s Fear), held right here in my hometown of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Undoubtedly I will […]


National Book Awards Shortlists Announced

The lists have been pared down from ten to five!  Here are the shortlists for the National Book Awards: Fiction: Karen E. Bender for Refund: Stories Angela Flournoy for The Turner House Lauren Groff for Fates and Furies Adam Johnson for Fortune Smiles: Stories Hanya Yanagihara for A Little Life   Nonfiction: Ta-Nehisi Coates for […]

NBA 2015 finalists

LitStack Recs: A Writer’s Notebook & The Glamourist Histories

A Writer’s Notebook by Somerset Maugham Somerset Maugham’s A Writer’s Notebook was first published in 1949, and though his work may have fallen out of fashion since then, in his time he was a literary light, outselling contemporaries like Joseph Conrad and Robert Louis Stevenson. The Guardian called Maugham “the first superstar novelist.” At the […]

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LitStack Review: The Hummingbird by Stephen P. Kiernan

The Hummingbird Stephen P. Kiernan William Morrow Release Date:  September 8, 2015 ISBN 978-0-06-236954-3 Deborah Birch, the heroine of Stephen P. Kiernan’s novel, The Hummingbird, must not have been an easy character to write.  She is no sharp tongued dilettante nor sharp eyed detective, no struggling artist confronting her past nor wide eyed twixter dipping […]


NEW YORK, NY October 8, 2015—Ace, an imprint of the Berkley Publishing Group, announces today the acquisition of Ninth City Burning, the first book in a stunning new science fiction series from debut novelist J. Patrick Black. Ace will publish Ninth City Burning in hardcover in September 2016.ace

Senior Editor Jessica Wade acquired world rights to the book and two sequels from Kirby Kim at Janklow & Nesbit. Series rights have already been sold in Germany, Brazil, and Poland. Film rights are being handled by Jon Cassir at CAA.

Ninth City Burning is a sweeping epic that takes place five hundred years after an alien invasion almost destroyed all of human civilization. They were wielding a mysterious force…but it turned out we could wield it too. Now, Earth is locked in a grinding war of attrition. The talented few capable of bending the power to their will are gathered into elite military academies, while those who refuse to answer the call struggle to survive the wilds of a ruined Earth. But a new invasion looms, and the last hope for humanity will fall to an unlikely collection of allies: a gifted but reckless young military cadet, a factory worker drafted as cannon fodder, a reluctant adept of the power, an outlaw nomad, and a brilliant scientist with nothing to lose. Together they will face a war that has brought their world to the brink of destruction.

“This thrilling debut marks the arrival of a major new talent. Ninth City Burning has unforgettably strong characterization, storytelling with amazingly grand scope, and a seamless melding of science fiction and fantasy elements.  It will really speak to fans of both classic science fiction novels, like Ender’s Game, and modern, like Red Rising,” Wade said.



Svetlana Alexievich Awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature

For only the 14th time in its 111 year history, the Nobel Prize for Literature has been awarded to a woman, and for the first time, to a journalist working strictly in the nonfiction genre:  Svetlana Alexievich, from Belarus.  In her highly intimate and very human works, Ms. Alexievich collects hundreds of interviews chronicling the […]

Svetlana Alexievich

LitStack Review: The Gates of Evangeline by Hester Young

The Gates of Evangeline Hester Young G. P. Putnam’s Sons Release Date:  September 1, 2015 ISBN 978-0-399174-001 It’s a compelling story. A woman is haunted by the sudden death of her young son.  That it was from “natural causes” does not assuage mother’s grief, ease the sudden emptiness, blunt the pervasiveness of memories.  She tries […]

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LitStack Rec – Jerusalem: A Cookbook & All the World

Jerusalem:  A Cookbook, by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi. Some cookbooks are defined by a generation. Your grandmother’s shelf likely held The Joy of Cooking or Julia Child’s The  French Chef. Your mother’s, The Silver Palate or The Moosewood Cookbook. Jerusalem is a cookbook that has similarly struck a culinary-cultural nerve, tapping into an unbridled […]


Finalists of the 2015 Kirkus Prize Announced

Founded in 1933, Kirkus has been “an authoritative voice in book discovery for 80 years”.  The associated  Kirkus Reviews magazine gives industry professionals a sneak peek at the most notable books prior to their publication date, and releases book reviews to consumers on a weekly basis.  The Kirkus Star icon affixed to selected reviews signifies […]


Three Writers Receive MacArthur “Genius Grants”

The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is proud of being “one of the nation’s largest independent foundations. Through the support it provides, the Foundation fosters the development of knowledge, nurtures individual creativity, strengthens institutions, helps improve public policy, and provides information to the public, primarily through support for public interest media.” Perhaps most […]

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The American Library Association’s Top Ten Frequently Challenged Books of 2014

Each year, the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom compiles a list of the top ten most frequently challenged books in order to inform the public about censorship in libraries and schools. The ALA actively condemns censorship and works to ensure free access to information, which is certainly something to celebrate during Banned Books […]


LitStack Recs: Wonder Woman Unbound & Blue Highways

Wonder Woman Unbound The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine Tim Hanley I’ve made this recommendation before, but with television’s Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. returning for a third season recently, as well as the DC Comics television tie-in Gotham back for season two, lots of superhero movies on the horizon, and a Wednesday […]


Litstack Recs: The Places In-Between & The Silmarillion

The Places In-Between, Rory Stewart In 2002, Rory Stewart made a walk across Afghanistan from Herat to Kabul. A scholar of Afghan history and language, he was well grounded the country’s ancient history, and in the grave first years after 9/11, sought to learn “what [Afghanistan] was like now.”  Part memoir, part political and cultural […]


LitStack Review: The Trials by Linda Nagata

The Trials Linda Nagata Saga Press Release Date:  August 18, 2015 ISBN 978-1-4814-4095-0 NOTE:  This review, by necessity, contains spoilers for the first book in the series, The Red:  First Light. The Trials is the second book of Linda Nagata’s marvelous military sci-fi series, “The Red Trilogy”.  It picks up about five months after The […]

The Trials

LitStack Review: Nightwise by R. S. Belcher

Nightwise R. S. Belcher Tor Books Release Date:  August 18, 2015 ISBN 978-0-7653-7460-8 Wow.  What a difference a bit of experience makes. I read R. S. Belcher’s debut novel, The Six Gun Tarot, shortly after it came out, and was very impressed with this supernatural Western thriller/morality tale, and especially with Mr. Belcher’s skill in […]


Jackie Collins, 1937 – 2015

Bestselling author Jackie Collins, who in 2013 was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) for services to fiction and charity, died on Saturday of breast cancer.  She was 77. Ms. Collins wrote hugely popular romance novels depicting the glamour and debauchery of high society Hollywood.  She wrote 32 novels, all […]


2015 National Book Awards Finalists Announced

After a week of reveals, we have a complete list of finalists for each of the four categories of the National Book Awards.  They include: FICTION: A Cure for Suicide by Jesse Ball Did You Ever Have a Family by Bill Clegg Refund by Karen E. Bender The Turner House by Angela Flournoy Fates and […]

Natl Book Award Fiction Finalists 2015

LitStack Recs: Blue Nights & Beautiful Ruins

Blue Nights, by Joan Didion Joan Didion is an author I’ve long revered, whose books have had a titanic effect on me. But when Blue Nights came out in 2011, I couldn’t bring myself to read it. The memoir is a counterpart to Didion’s 2005 memoir, The Year of Magical Thinking, which tracks the aftermath […]


2015 Man Booker Shortlist Announced

The shortlist for the United Kingdom’s most prestigious literary award has just been announced, and the six finalists are: A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James (Jamaica) Satin Island by Tom McCarthy (UK) The Fishermen by Chigozie Obioma (Nigeria) The Year of the Runaways by Sunjeev Sahota (UK) A Spool of Blue Thread […]

Man Booker shortlist 2015

Gimbling in the Wabe – Blinders

(In which there is profanity as a point of discussion and talk of partial nudity in the same vein; even though it’s all pretty genial, consider yourself warned.) I was perusing Pinterest the other day, looking for ideas for a dinnertime meal that all the disparate palates in my family maybe, just maybe, might agree […]

empty plate

Joy Harjo Wins the Wallace Stevens Award

The Academy of American Poets announced on Thursday that Joy Harjo has won the Wallace Stevens Award, recognizing her outstanding and proven mastery in the art of poetry.  The award carries a $100,000 stipend.  Ms. Harjo was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma (where she still lives), and is a member of the Mvskoke/Creek Nation.  She received […]

Joy Harjo
The Casquette Girls by Alys Arden cas girls
Published by: Skyscape
Publication date: November 17th 2015
Genres: Paranormal, Young AdultSynopsis:

After the storm of the century rips apart New Orleans, sixteen-year-old Adele Le Moyne and her father are among the first to return. Adele wants nothing more than to resume her normal life, but with the silent city resembling a war zone, a parish-wide curfew, and mysterious new faces lurking in the abandoned French Quarter, normal needs a new definition.

Strange events—even for New Orleans—lead Adele to an attic that has been sealed for three hundred years. The chaos she accidentally unleashes threatens not only her but also everyone she knows.

Caught in a hurricane of myths and monsters, Adele must untangle a web of magic that weaves the climbing murder rate back to her own ancestors. But who can you trust in a city where everyone has secrets and keeping them can mean life or death? Unless…you’re immortal.

Revised edition: This edition of The Casquette Girls includes editorial revisions.


ALYS ARDEN grew up in the Vieux Carré, cut her teeth on the streets of New York, and has worked all around the world since. She still plans to run away with the circus one day.


Cory Doctorow’s “Little Brother” Optioned by Paramount

The Tracking Board broke the news, and Cory Doctorow confirmed it on  Little Brother, Mr. Doctorow’s phenomenal (and highly acclaimed) young adult novel has been picked up by Paramount Pictures for development into a major motion picture. Little Brother is the story of white-bread middle class kid Marcus Yallow, a kind of nerdy gamer […]


Wonder Woman UnboundWW
The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine
Tim Hanley

College level English classes are one my daughter’s least favorite scholastic experience, but I love ’em, because I get to play research assistant for her papers. She learns organization, thesis concepts, citation usage and all sorts of structural skills, and I learn new stuff about interesting topics. So I was especially excited when the topic for her newest assignment was “It’s Time for a Wonder Woman Movie”, because I got to learn about – you guessed it – Wonder Woman!

During our search for reference material, we came across the book “Wonder Woman Unbound – The Curious History of the World’s Most Famous Heroine” by Tim Hanley, and oh, my – while I normally scan books obtained for reference, this one grabbed me from the onset and I found myself devouring the entire thing, regardless of its applicability to my daughter’s needs. Poor thing, my daughter! I think she had to draw on quite a bit of patience as I regaled her with story after story of not only Wonder Woman’s comic origins and development, but also how it played in with – or against – societal movement and pop culture development.

Author Tim Hanley is quite the subject matter expert when it comes to Wonder Woman, but he does it in an effortless, conversational and enthusiastic way that makes what could have been somewhat dry material instead a very intriguing and entertaining read. He is able to pull in lots of elements – comic book development, the growth (and in some cases, the decline) of the comic book publishing industry, the whims and triggers of society and historical elements – and blend them in a thoroughly engaging and easy to follow read that not only shines a light on Wonder Woman but our society as a whole. He obviously is a fan, but one who is able to share his enthusiasm with devotee and novice alike.

“In Wonder Woman, Marston (psychologist William Moulton Marston, creator of Wonder Woman in 1941) presented a brand-new kind of character. While his ideas about female superiority never really caught on, the long-term impact of the first powerful, independent female superhero cannot be understated. In a genre that so rigidly enforced typical gender roles and relied on a very narrow view of femininity, Wonder Woman shattered those expectations for millions of young readers each month. It’s sometimes hard to see the ingrained societal structures that dictate daily life, but by inverting these structures Wonder Woman comics shed a light on the tenets of these systems, along with a sharp critique.”

Whether you are a Marvel Cinematic Universe buff, a DC comics die-hard, a Wonder Woman fan or simply someone who likes to gather knowledge, “Wonder Woman Unbound” would be a great read for you. Fun, captivating, charming, and chock full of information, stories, and clear deduction, “Wonder Woman Unbound” will not only expand your horizons, but give you a greater appreciation of this trend-setting industry that birthed not only one of our greatest cultural heroines, but harbors one of our most enduring pastimes – the comic book universe.

—Sharon Browning

Pages: 1 2

Stephen King is a 2014 National Medal of Arts Recipient

On September 10, President Obama will present this year’s National Medal of Arts.  One of the eleven recipients will be prolific horror, suspense and fantasy author Stephen King.  According to the official announcement, “Mr. King combines his remarkable storytelling with his sharp analysis of human nature. For decades, his works of horror, suspense, science fiction, […]

Stephen King signs the copies of his book 'Rivival' at Barnes & Noble Union Square in New York City on November 11, 2014.

Gimbling in the Wabe – Filters

In Linda Nagata’s excellent real world sci-fi thriller, The Red: First Light, the main characters struggle to grasp the concept of an external agent, in the form of an autonomous digital program, which is working to engineer the distribution of information through the Cloud (the network of servers that stores and shares digital information).  This […]


LitStack Recs: Vanity Fair & The Cage

Vanity  Fair William Makepeace Thackeray The mid-nineteenth century didn’t have reality television, but it did have William Makepeace Thackeray’s Vanity Fair, and the novel’s social-climbing, backbiting and profligate behavior rivals any episode of Real Housewives. Subtitled A Novel Without a Hero, the book was published in 1847 and made Thackeray a wealthy man. And though […]


2015 Chesley Awards Announced

The Hugo Awards weren’t the only awards given out recently at the 73rd World Science Fiction Convention held recently in Spokane, Washington!  The Association of Science Fiction & Fantasy Artists (ASFA) also awarded their 2015 Chesley Awards, recognizing individual artistic works and achievements within the fantasy and science fiction literary genre. Here is a list […]

Chesley michael-hayes-alegretto-lowres-1024x758

Oliver Sacks, Neurologist and Author, Dies at 82

Above all, I have been a sentient being, a thinking animal, on this beautiful planet, and that in itself has been an enormous privilege and adventure. ~  Oliver Sacks, February 2015 When my son came home from college after declaring a psychology major, one of the textbooks he brought with him was Oliver Sacks’ The […]


LitStack Review – The Affinities by Robert Charles Wilson

The Affinities Robert Charles Wilson Tor Books Release Date:  April 21, 2015 ISBN 978-0-7653-3262-2 Facebook.  Twitter.  Tumblr.  Instagram.  Snapchat.  LinkedIn.  Pinterest.  Google+.  Reddit.  Social media.  These and other sites keep us connected to friends, family, and strangers with like interests (or not, as the case may be).  But what if the germ of the idea […]


Tour Banner - Thick Love

Title: Thick Love (Thin Love, #2)
Author: Eden Butler
Genre: NA | Contemporary Romance
Release Date: August 31, 2015
Hosted by As the Pages Turn




He doesn’t ask their names.

He doesn’t deserve to know them.

Ransom Riley Hale’s friends think his life is charmed: first string as a freshman on a championship-winning college football team. A father with two Super Bowl rings. A mother with platinum albums and multiple Grammies under her belt. But that brilliant shine on the surface hides the darkness beneath; it’s all Ransom has ever known.

Despite the shadows he walked in, once there was a blinding light fracturing the darkness. It brought the promise of hope and happiness. He’d been careless, filled with pride and stupidity and lost that light. Ripped it from the world.

Now, the shadows are dimming again. Aly King surges into his life threatening to pull him from the darkness. She is everything Ransom can never be again. Her light feels too warm, promises him that there is more waiting for him beyond the shadows.

But the shadows are relentless, resurfacing when he thinks he is safe, and Ransom knows he must keep Aly from them too before he pulls her down into the darkness with him.

Purchase Thick LoveAmazon | Amazon UK | B&N | Kobo | iTunes

Thick Love – Excerpt

“Dance with me,” I said. He only stared up at me blankly.

“I don’t feel like practicing.”

“I’m not asking you to practice. I’m asking you to dance.”

Ransom’s body stiffened when I picked up his hand, but he didn’t fight me. “Just be here with me. Me and you and the music.”

We came together in the center of my living room with that slow, soothing music wrapping around us. There was no Kizomba, no prequel to a seduction we both wanted to avoid. There was just Ransom bending low, arms around me, hand taking mine to hold against his chest. After a few seconds, the tension lessened, and his body did not feel as rigid. It felt peaceful, and safe, and simple—just two people, holding each other, swaying to the music.

His mouth hovered near my forehead and as we moved together with no form or practiced steps, Ransom’s grip on my waist got tighter. “I wish I could breathe again. I want that so bad.” The words were whispered, low.

I closed my eyes, reminding myself that I couldn’t touch him.

“Ransom. You can.”

He looked down at me and right then I saw just how lost he was. This realization didn’t come from flippant comments he made to me or desperate excuses I overheard him make. It was all there right in his eyes—the loneliness, the pain, as though each mistake he’d made was etched into the rise of his cheekbones and the worried, faint lines on his forehead. He was still drifting; he had been drifting for so damn long.

The pain in his eyes drew me in. There was nothing I could say that would make his hurt lessen. There was nothing that would take him from the lingering sorrow he’d created for himself. So I didn’t speak, didn’t give him advice I knew he’d never take. I just watched Ransom’s eyes, and felt the slow way he moved. And then with my hand on the back of his neck, I pulled his face towards me, I took his lips, kissing him, pouring into that kiss everything I’d held back from him since we first met.

This is who I am. This is what I want. That voice came from someplace hidden and secret inside me.

It was minutes, minutes of nothing but my mouth on his, nothing but two people finding solace in each other, before

I realized I’d messed up.

He didn’t seem to want me to pull away, but didn’t stop me when I did. Shaking my head, I smoothed the collar on his shirt, unable to look at him. “I’m…modi, Ransom, I’m sorry.”

Ransom pulled my chin up and smoothed his thumb over my cheek, down the slope of my chin before he returned his attention to my eyes. “I don’t think I am.”

It was a moment I thought I’d always wanted. Him looking at me like I was real, like he saw me, finally saw me. I’d seen that look once before, just as Ransom whispered my name and kissed me over and over the first time. It wasn’t the look of someone hopeless. It was open and raw and I realized right then that I’d give anything for Ransom to never stop looking at me.

But this was against our rules. This wasn’t how we were supposed to be. I took his hand, thought of pulling it away from my face but didn’t have the strength, liked how it felt on my face too much. “Friends don’t kiss, Ransom.”

A small nod, and his eyes narrowed. His grip around me tightened. The music around us swelled. “No, they don’t,” he said, still touching my face, inching closer and I knew, right then, he was definitely not my friend.

Books in the Thin Love Series

Thin Love My Beloved THICK_LOVE_COVER
Thin Love Series Purchase LinksAmazon | Amazon UK | B&N | Kobo | iTunes

About Eden Butler

Eden Butler PicEden Butler is an editor and writer of New Adult Romance and SciFi and Fantasy novels and the nine-times great-granddaughter of an honest-to-God English pirate. This could explain her affinity for rule breaking and rum. Her debut novel, a New Adult, Contemporary (no cliffie) Romance, “Chasing Serenity” launched in October 2013 and quickly became an Amazon bestseller.

When she’s not writing or wondering about her possibly Jack Sparrowesque ancestor, Eden edits, reads and spends way too much time watching rugby, Doctor Who and New Orleans Saints football.

She is currently imprisoned under teenage rule alongside her husband in southeast Louisiana.

Please send help.

Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Tumblr | Blog | Goodreads

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Horror Film Writer, Director Wes Craven Dies at 76

Horror films don’t create fear.  They release it. – Wes Craven On Sunday, August 30, 2015, horror genre legend Wes Craven succumbed to brain cancer; he was 76. Writer, director, executive producer, cinematographer, editor (even actor), he left his touch on many of the most iconic (and top grossing) American horror films:  “A Swamp Thing”, […]


Gimbling in the Wabe – Acknowledging Who We Are

On Wednesday, August 26, a television reporter and her photographer partner were gunned down while conducting a live interview during a morning telecast in Moneta, Virginia.  The woman being interviewed was also shot and had to undergo emergency surgery, but is expected to survive.  The gunman, a disgruntled employee of the station, later shot himself […]


August 24th → Totally Booked Blog

August 25th → Short and Sassy Book Blurbs

August 26th → The Book Vigilante Reviews

August 27th → LitStack

August 28th → As the Pages Turn

Pre-Release Banner - Thick Love

Title: Thick Love (Thin Love, #2)
Author: Eden Butler
Genre: NA | Contemporary Romance
Release Date: August 31, 2015




He doesn’t ask their names.

He doesn’t deserve to know them.

Ransom Riley Hale’s friends think his life is charmed: first string as a freshman on a championship-winning college football team. A father with two Super Bowl rings. A mother with platinum albums and multiple Grammies under her belt. But that brilliant shine on the surface hides the darkness beneath; it’s all Ransom has ever known.

Despite the shadows he walked in, once there was a blinding light fracturing the darkness. It brought the promise of hope and happiness. He’d been careless, filled with pride and stupidity and lost that light. Ripped it from the world.

Now, the shadows are dimming again. Aly King surges into his life threatening to pull him from the darkness. She is everything Ransom can never be again. Her light feels too warm, promises him that there is more waiting for him beyond the shadows.

But the shadows are relentless, resurfacing when he thinks he is safe, and Ransom knows he must keep Aly from them too before he pulls her down into the darkness with him.

Pre-Order Thick LoveAmazon | Amazon UK | B&N | Kobo | iTunes


A quick flash of memory, those violent, vicious images of Emily, of me, and I felt the dread, the burning pain filter through my body, making me desperate to forget everything else. To simply, single-mindedly, do my job.

“I…I can make you feel good.” I doubted she heard my promise. Either of them.

The girl laying in front of me was still nervous, hands trembling, matching the quick shiver of my fingers, but I couldn’t stop her from worrying, from feeling whatever it was that had her shaking as I came closer, lowering those pink straps, running my tongue over the curves of her generous tits.

“You’re beautiful here, sugar.” She tasted like her lilac-smelling perfume. She was delicious and the sounds she made as I kissed up her neck, over her collarbone encouraged me. “And here…” I said, marveling at those perfectly round nipples I uncovered, smiling at the shocked, awed expression on her face when I grazed my thumbs over those peaks. “Pink and hard, and so damn sweet.” She moaned, the sound louder, breathless when I took one nipple between my thumb and forefinger. The sensations rose up then, her voice like a melody, those raspy intakes of breath heady, shooting straight to my chest, speeding my heart. “That feels good, doesn’t it?”

“Yeah…yes.” And the rasp in her voice only caught, became breathless when I rolled the nipple with a little more pressure. “God I’m…”

I caught the signs, knew what she wanted, knew that she was scared, still nervous around me, but that she was ready to fall. She gripped her inner thigh, tugging on her loose skirt and I couldn’t help but grin, knowing she was just on the edge of having what she wanted. She was right there and I’d gladly see her off that cliff.

“Touch yourself if you need to.” Red’s quick glance, her widened eyes and the return of her blush pulled a small laugh from me. “You don’t need to worry about me, sweetheart. Nothing you do leaves this room. On my hon…” No. I couldn’t say that. I had no honor. Not anymore. I wanted it back, I wanted to earn it, but it wasn’t mine, not yet. “I promise.”

“I don’t know…how.”

“I’ll show you.” I was careful to watch her face, gage her reactions, see if she’d change her mind, but my fingers on her skirt, pulling it off, then slipping down her too sweet, too girly cotton panties did nothing to make her stop me. “Relax. Just take a breath.” And she tried, nodded again but dug her fingers into my sheets as though she needed some grip to keep gravity in check, like she couldn’t manage to trust touching herself. It was fine. I’d do it for her.

She was pink everywhere. Pink and wet and pulsing like a grape on the vine full and ready for the taking. This wouldn’t take long, I knew that. This girl was hungry for something she couldn’t quite reach. Something she probably didn’t even understand. So I was gentle as I lowered over her, as undressed her completely, separated her folds with my big fingers and brushed my tongue against that swollen clit. I thought she probably felt my smile against her pussy when I watched her, when the flush on her skin and those panting breaths made her skin glow. God, she looked beautiful. Ready to burst. “Is that good?”

“So…so good. God…”

“This is better.” Red bucked against my fingers when I slipped them inside, feeling the searing heat, the tight, tight muscles that wrapped around my fingers. Those smells, the feel of her, the wetness, the hiss of her throaty voice when she groaned, it was like a slice to my chest, feeling all of this at once, knowing I could only taste, could only touch.
My penance. My punishment for taking something that had never been mine.


My fingers dipping deeper, tongue flicking fast, Red only became wetter and she dug her fingers so hard against my sheets that her knuckles turned white. “Squeeze my fingers.” And she did, tight, her inner muscles greedily gripping around my fingers and then the memory came back, like it always did. That small body, that sweet, sweet taste, the first I’d ever had.
The way she’d call my name, how she’d tasted on my tongue. That memory crippled me. Every damn time. The memory stung, but I opened up and let it in, taking that pain, cradling it—Emily’s tight, wet body gripping my fingers, pulsing against me. How fascinated I’d been by her reactions, by how responsive she was. I had felt like a god. I’d felt powerful and strong and so very astounded that it was me, the clumsy, senseless sixteen year old that made Emily writhe against my fingers. Me that had her pulling at my hair, pushing me deeper into her body. Me that she loved.

The same me who had wrecked everything.

Red’s climax was hard and I took her scream, her arching, quaking body, her pulsing wetness, and let her ride it out with my fingers still deep inside of her. Then I slowly slipped out of her drenched pussy, and laid my hand flat on her mound, helping her to ease down. Once she was calm I took the opportunity to dry my face, to scrub my palms into my eyes, hoping that the memory of Emily would fade; hoping that her face, her taste, would finally be erased by the girl laying next to me.
But she always came back, my girl, my favorite redhead. Her voice, her touch, the smell of Emily’s hair was embedded into my skin, every recall of her, every devastating memory was part of my body, ran deeper than my cells.

There was no erasing her.

Maybe it was the red hair. Maybe it was the freckles, but for the hundredth time it seemed, touching another girl, tasting someone else’s body, hadn’t managed to pull Emily from my thoughts.

I didn’t think anyone ever would.

When the girl’s breaths evened out and she rolled to her side, I took her hand, laid next to her. “When you’re alone, when you want to feel this again, touch yourself deep.” I picked up her hand, kissed her knuckles. “Use those beautiful hips to ride your fingers.”


I liked that she was shy again, as though she was just realizing that it was her voice that shouted out into the room, her body that had washed over in pleasure. But the blush didn’t return.

“Don’t ever let anybody tell you what your body needs. Only you can know that and don’t you settle until you find someone that will give you what you need.”


I shook my head, knowing what she’d say. Knowing what the pull of her frowning lips meant. Sympathy. Pity. I’d seen it a hundred times before. “I’m good, sweetheart, really.”

“You…you were crying.”

It would be so damn easy to talk to this girl. She didn’t know me. She knew nothing about my folks or my baby brother or that my mother was about to have another one. She didn’t know about the years Mom and I spent in Nashville, how I’d know football superstar Kona Hale was my father since I was thirteen. Red didn’t know about all the fuck ups I’d made. She didn’t know about my anger and my need to excel.

She didn’t know about the biggest shadow clouding my life. It had nothing to do with having successful, famous parents or the Great Love of theirs that the media loved to wax on and on about.
Red only knew what her friends had told her about me. She only knew that I was the first person to make her come. She knew nothing else, and sometimes it was easier telling a total stranger about all the bullshit weighing you down than your own blood.

But I couldn’t take the pity.

Finally, I reached down to drop a quick kiss against her lips. “Nah, sugar. Just a little sweat. You’re sweet to worry, but I’m fine. Really.”

“You look, I dunno. So lost.” Eyes snapping to hers, that defensive anger shot into my blood, but I pulled it back, reminding myself that she had no idea who I was. She was worried about me, a complete stranger worried about me. If she only knew how misplaced that concern was.
“I just thought maybe you would want…”

But I cut her off, standing to pick up her clothes. She dressed in silence with me waiting for her near the door. It was a little harsh, but seemed to work. They’d come for a release. I’d give it to them gladly, easily. There was no need to linger.

“Thank you, really.” Red looked me in the eyes, all the hints of shyness now absent from her features. She reached for my face, likely meaning to comfort me, but I pulled away from her, catching her hand before she did. Another smile and a single nod and the redhead didn’t try again. “You’re a good person, Ransom.”

Behind my closed eyelids, I said a little prayer, wishing that it could be true, and Red took her cue, leaving my room with the smell of her climax and the scent of lilac perfuming the air.
“No, sweetheart. I’m not good at all,” I whispered after her.

Books in the Thin Love Series

Thin Love My Beloved THICK_LOVE_COVER
Thin Love Series Purchase LinksAmazon | Amazon UK | B&N | Kobo | iTunes
Want more? Head to As the Pages Turn tomorrow (August 28th) for the last installment. The blog will be revealing the final section of the prologue and chapter one of THICK LOVE sneak peek. If you haven’t read the previous three sneak peek installments make sure to head back to Totally Booked Blog (Part I), Short and Sassy Book Blurbs (Part II) and The Book Vigilante Reviews (Part III).

August 24thTotally Booked Blog

August 25thShort and Sassy Book Blurbs

August 26thThe Book Vigilante Reviews

August 27thShh Mom’s Reading

August 28thAs the Pages Turn

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About Eden Butler

Eden Butler PicEden Butler is an editor and writer of New Adult Romance and SciFi and Fantasy novels and the nine-times great-granddaughter of an honest-to-God English pirate. This could explain her affinity for rule breaking and rum. Her debut novel, a New Adult, Contemporary (no cliffie) Romance, “Chasing Serenity” launched in October 2013 and quickly became an Amazon bestseller.

When she’s not writing or wondering about her possibly Jack Sparrowesque ancestor, Eden edits, reads and spends way too much time watching rugby, Doctor Who and New Orleans Saints football.

She is currently imprisoned under teenage rule alongside her husband in southeast Louisiana.

Please send help.

Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest | Tumblr | Blog | Goodreads


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A Fort of Nine Towersfort
Qais Akbar Omar

From a young boy’s memories comes a remarkable true story of the changes in Afghanistan in the last few decades, a story that is full of strength as well as fear, and one that overwhelmingly testifies of a love of family, and strong ties to the land. While it does not flinch from atrocities, terror and a simmering sense of outrage, it also does not hesitate to show that even in desperate times there can be beauty, joy, and life well lived.

The book begins with Qais as a young boy in Russian occupied Kabul, shortly after the Soviet withdrawal in 1989 and right before the arrival of the Mujahedin, or Holy Warriors, in 1991. While life in an occupied country was not ideal, especially with the lack of recourse against hostile troops and the repression of religious traditions, there was at least an aspect of stability; business proceeded as normal, the economy functioned, trade flowed between Afghanistan and its neighbors. Qais’ father was part of the family carpet selling business, providing them with a solid income and a well known presence in the city. His mother had a good job at a bank, and the children were well schooled and lovingly tended. Still, they, like many Afghans, they were hopeful that a shift in power from foreign occupation to the groups of Mujahedin who had banded together not only throughout Afghanistan, but also in Pakistan and Iran, would bring about a resurgence in Afghan self-governance, justice, and independence.

Things were good for a few months. Markets were full and prices were cheap, people could travel wherever and whenever they wanted without being afraid of being caught in the crossfire between Russian troops and Afghan rebels. The mood of the country was one of great optimism. But before long, small squabbles between different Mujahedin factions turned into fights that literally exploded in Kabul and across Afghanistan. Qais and his family were caught in the middle.
What would you do if your family’s livelihood was stolen, and you were afraid to leave your home because there were snipers in the hills and on the rooftops who would shoot anyone for target practice, regardless of who they were? If bombs and mortar shells fell constantly, leveling trees, buildings, everything that once was green and beautiful? What if you had no way of communicating with friends and relatives, of knowing if they had fled or been killed or were holed up in their homes? If the city of your birth and where you have lived your entire life is now the center of chaos and lawlessness engulfing an entire nation?

If you are like Qais Akbar Omar, you learn to endure. You take advantage of what you can, you learn how to cope, you lean on your family and the contacts you have made over the years, and you listen to your father, your uncles, your grandfather. Sometimes you fight. Sometimes, you can’t. Sometimes you flee. But you never give up hope. You never let go of those around you. You hold on to your faith, you learn where you can, and you live your life as best you can.

In 1996, the bombs suddenly stop falling in Kabul. The Taliban has come to Afghanistan, and everything changes again. Factions no longer fight in the street, but they have been replaced by an ever greater threat – one of ignorance and rigidity, bloodily backed by heavy handed and strangling ideologies that are based more on power than they are on religious principle, strictly enforced through edict, indiscriminate seizure, torture and fear with no recourse, no tolerance. Bombs no longer fall, but the fear of the people is even more razor sharp. This is the backdrop of Qais’ adolescence. But rather than be broken, Qais and his family endure. They hold on to each other, they scrap for everything they can. They hope – and they teach those of us who will stop to listen to their story.

A Fort of Nine Towers is a remarkable book in that it is simply written about a time and a life that is certainly not simple. Author Omar’s voice is courteous, clear, and personal. This is not a book that spends a lot of time speaking of histories and ideologies, of relating philosophies or religious dogma, other than what is needed to understand what is happening. He is not trying to convince us of anything, but simply to share his story with us, and in doing that, to give us an understanding of his life and country. And he succeeds, because of his honesty. In that honesty, we learn so much more than we would from newspaper articles or history books.

For many of us, knowledge of Afghanistan is limited to the actions of September 11, 2001, military actions against the Taliban, hostilities spilling in from Iraq, Iran, and Pakistan, and the hunt for Osama Bin Laden. But this land and this people have had an advanced culture for thousands of years before the birth of Christ. They are a people who deserve the understanding of our world. A Fort of Nine Towers is a gripping and vital part of that understanding.

—Sharon Browning

Pages: 1 2

2015 Hugo Awards Announced

The Hugo Awards were handed out on Saturday night at Worldcon in Spokane, Washington, and although the balloting process was contentious and full of drama, in the end the community of science fiction and fantasy enthusiasts came together.  The awards ceremony, hosted by David Gerrold and Tananarive Due, was by all accounts warm, witty, and […]

Julie Dillon Artificial Daydreams

Gimbling in the Wabe – Miserable Fiction

This Gimbling first appeared in November 2013.  I was reading a book the other day.  It was a very good book, extremely well written, very imaginative.  The images it evoked were sharp and emotive; it was clear what the author was trying to convey, her motives unfolded sensibly and organically.  This particular book had been […]

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The Presidential Summer Reading List

As The Hill reported last week, President Barack Obama chose six books to read during his 16-day vacation on Martha’s Vineyard. Here’s a rundown.

Between The World and Me, by Ta-Nahisi Coates. An educator and journalist for The Atlantic Monthly, Coates set out to write this memoir in the form of a letter to his son, inspired to pen a  contemporary version of James Baldwin’s The Fire Next Time. Called “powerful and passionate” by the New York Times, Coates’ exploration tracks, as Toni Morrison described, “the hazards and hopes of black male life,” and what it means now to be black in America.


All That Is, by James Salter. The esteemed novelist and short story writer’s final book was published to high praise in 2013, two years before his death at age 90. Considered a departure from his previous work, known for its compression and tightly controlled narratives, All That Is tracks the life of one James Bowman from his deployment to the Pacific theater in World War II, through divorce, marriage and old age. In his 2013 review, Malcolm Jones called the novel a “work that manages to be both recognizable…and yet strikingly original.”

All The Light We Cannot See, by Anthony Doerr. Winner of this year’s Pulitzer Prize in Fiction, Doerr’s novel, his second, and fifth book, is a braided narrative of two children during World War II, the blind Marie-Laure, part of the French Resistance, and Werner, serving the Thousand-Year Reich. Structured in short chapters, and told in alternating points of view, the brevity serves to deepen the portrayals. Amanda Vaill, in her 2014 The Washington Post review, said, “I’m not sure I will read a better novel this year.”

The Sixth Extinction, by Elizabeth Kolbert. In lucid mix of storytelling and reportage, Kolbert, a staff writer at The New Yorker, gives an account of the what Al Gore, in his review called the “violent collision between civilization and our planet’s ecosystem.” In her examination of the environmental effects on endangered and fragile places like the Andes, the Amazon rain forest, the Great Barrier Reef, Kolbert shows what is at stake, and what can be lost, if governmental policy continues to ignore real effects upon evolution and extinction.

The Lowland, by Jhumpa Lahiri. Political upheaval, two brothers, immigration and separation occupy this saga of divisiveness and war in the social and political world of 1950’s Calcutta and the Naxalite Movement. Nominated for the 2013 Man Booker Prize, Lahiri’s novel, her second and fourth book, looks at the saga of upheaval, immigration, and as Maureen Corrigan in her 2013 review said, a place where “Geography is destiny.”

Washington: A Life, by Ron Chernow. Published in 2010, Chernow’s book is a comprehensive look at the United States’ first president. Six years in the making, the biography was six years in the making, and Chernow, who was once a business journalist, first began the book while writing another on Alexander Hamilton. Drawing largely on Washington’s extensive record-keeping, the book won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Biography.










So what did The President leave out? Here’s Mark Lawson at The Guardian on what’s not on the list:

“In fiction, the striking absences are Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman – possibly because the president has already read the racially contentious companion novel to To Kill a Mockingbird, or because he doesn’t want to be seen reading it – and any crime or thriller titles, which have been the genres most favoured by previous recent occupants of the Oval Office. Bill Clinton helped to popularise the novels of Walter Mosley and was an admirer of PD James, while both Clinton and the first President Bush were declared fans of Richard North Patterson. Obama, though, prefers the sort of stories that please the judges of the fancier writing prizes: Doerr won the Pulitzer, Lahiri was a finalist for the National book award. “

And as other literary observers have also done over the past week, Lawson unpacks the Presidential reading list as what the choices might signify.

—Lauren Alwan




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CBS Snaps Up Ian McDonald’s “Luna: New Moon”

You gotta love it when there is a bidding war amongst entertainment conglomerates for the rights to a science fiction work that hasn’t even been published yet.  But such is the case with prolific British sci-fi writer Ian McDonald’s new novel, Luna: New Moon, set to be released on September 22. In an article dated […]


Gimbling in the Wabe – The View from My Soapbox

Every time I see one particular television commercial for the Hyundai Tucson CUV (which I learned is an acronym for “crossover utility vehicle” as opposed to an SUV, or “sports utility vehicle”… one site called a CUV as “a car on steroids”), I get really, really pis…. er, upset. I shouldn’t.  I mean, we should […]


A Brief Look at Father Memoirs

Stories that center on fathers have a distinct place in the memoir genre. For better or worse, fathers hold a place that intersects with the world and experience in a way far different from that of a mother’s. As in Jung’s archetypes, fathers are symbols of worldliness and action, yet many of the fathers depicted in these memoirs embody qualities both maternal and paternal. They are both figures of power and the bearers of a powerful and necessary love. That love is often complicated by flaws and (as is so often the occasion in memoir), a distance that incites yearning. The genre further complicates as it subdivides into father memoirs by sons and by daughters. Yet the constant is often that of distance—geographic, emotional, or both. This is especially true in the now-classic memoir, President Barack Obama’s Dreams of My Father.

It’s as good a place as any to start. This father memoir (published in 1995) portrays the mix of longing and mystery that fathers so often hold. Early on, we find the young Barack struggling academically and socially under the specter of his distant father, the elder Obama, a brilliant, commanding, but ultimately absent figure who  exists at a remove. As a result, he occupies a near-mythic status. He appears once, when the young Barack is ten years old, a proximity that is affecting enough to instill in the young son a persistent need to meet the father’s expectations. The memoir tracks this odyssey, which is as much an internal journey as external, and charts the young Barack’s love of history, books (by James Baldwin, Langston Hughes, Nietzsche and St. Augustine among them), and of course, law and governance. In a review, the New York Times observed that in his portraying himself and the search for identity as a fatherless son, President Obama “is at once the solitary outsider who learns to stop pressing his nose to the glass and the coolly omniscient observer providing us with a choral view of his past,” which is as good a definition of a father memoir protagonist as I’ve yet to read.

Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father, by Alysia Abbott.


As mentioned here in last week’s LitStack Recs, Abbott mines both the distance and closeness that defined her relationship with the father, the poet and activist Steve Abbott, who became her primary caregiver after the death of her mother. Raised by her single father after the death of her mother, Barbara, in a car accident, the young Alysia is raised with both love and a lack of convention. Though at the heart of the story is her father’s art, but also his closeted life as gay, eventual coming out, and his  death from AIDS in 1992. Like Dreams of My Father, the account is as much a personal one as an important social document.


Epilogue, by Will Boast

Both a remembrance and a elegiac account of the loss of a family, Boast’s 2014 memoir (a recipient of The Rome Prize) tracks the tragic early death of his mother  Nancy, the untimely death of his younger brother Rory, and the family secret left behind after his father Andrew’s death (when Will was twenty-four). In straightforward, and often painfully honest terms, Boast portrays the years growing up in Fontana, Wisconsin, and the assimilation sought by his English-born parents (who met and married in 1970s Southampton). But what drives this gripping memoir is the discovery after Andrew’s death of a first marriage and the wife and two sons he left behind in England. This is the inciting event that drives Will’s aim to connect with them, and as he does, unravels the mystery of his father’s life. As with the best memoirs, the story belongs to its narrator, both in the grief and loss Will suffers at losing his family of origin and his search to find the family he has left.


The Shadow Man, A Daughter’s Search for her Father, by Mary Gordon

This now-classic memoir (published in 1996), by acclaimed novelist Mary Gordon, tracks another father secret, Gordon’s discovery in her mid-forties that her father was not Catholic, but Jewish. In a review by the LA Times, Gordon’s memoir was called an investigation of deception and self-deception, an apt description of this memoir’s mystery-like mood. David Gordon’s flaws, he is a novelist manqué and man about town, are more than apparent to the reader, yet Gordon idealizes her father. Though rather than impede the author’s believability, her stance only adds to the sadness and tension of her account. A “first family” enters into the storyline here as well, but instead of offering hope, as it does for Boast, the discovery serves as the initial crack that ultimately dismantles the falsehoods.

This Boy’s Life: A Memoir, by Tobias  Wolff 

Published in 1989, Wolff’s memoir has since become a classic of the contemporary genre. The preeminent story writer and novelist has said This Boy’s Life began as notes written to himself about his boyhood on his peripatetic and often tumultuous boyhood after his mother flees her marriage. And though for young Toby, his mother is essential to the story—in her tragic uncertainty and unfortunate choices—it’s the absence of the father that drives Toby’s yearning and so many of his actions. In a voice that is both cutting and honest, Wolff looks at the damaged men, like his stepfather, Dwight, and the distant father in  who seems most influential in the ambition Toby sets for himself, to be accepted at an elite boarding school—a feat that requires no small amount of deception and self-reinvention.


Patrimony: A True Story, by Philip Roth

Roth’s 1991 memoir, charts the illness and death of his father, Herman Roth, from an inoperable brain tumor. In Roth’s trademark penetrating and melancholy style, he charts the account of his widowed, eighty-six year old father, and in a decidedly anti-Rothian stance, offers one of the more tender entries into the Roth canon. Roth shows an unvarnished, full-faceted picture of what it’s like to care for an elderly parent—the humiliations, the tensions and the exhaustion—while showing us the man Herman had once been, and in many ways still is, powerful, competent, charismatic. For me, as a woman reading Roth (and often in awe of the prose) it’s an understatement to say there are moments when it feels like I’m reading dispatches from an unfriendly country. Yet in this memoir, Roth adopts a different stance, one informed by filial respect and clear-sightedness. Though no memoir can possibly be “true,” what of the truth can be known surely has its source in the son’s love for his father.

—Lauren Alwan

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When Alan Cheuse, writer, reader, teacher, and champion of books, died on July 31, the literary world lost one of its most influential advocates. A longtime book critic for NPR (review titles for All Things Considered for more than thirty years), Cheuse’s reviews were famously deft and insightful. And as a writer of literary fiction whose love of reading extended across genres, he loved a good story well told. Here’s a passage from a recent review of The Black Snow, by Irish writer Paul Lynch, an indication of Cheuse’s regard for close observation and careful language:

As Lynch presents the story, it becomes an out-of-the-ordinary creation, a novel in which sentence after sentence come so beautifully alive in all of the fullness of its diction and meaning that it makes most other contemporary Irish fiction seem dull by comparison, such as the description of the face of the doomed farmhand, Matthew Peoples, a face like a lived-in map. “The high terrain of his cheekbones and the spread of red veins on the pads of his cheeks like great rivers were written on him or the farmer looking up and seeing a fault over the earth that rived the morning sky with a ridge of low cloud-like dirt snow sided on a road.”

In an obituary published last week, the New York Times quoted Cheuse’s advice to, “Live as much as you can, read as much as you can, and write as much as you can.” The author’s family asked, via his web site, that in his honor, remember to “raise a glass of wine (or whatever you may be drinking), tell a joke, hug someone that you love, be kind, and read a great story.”

Read the New York Times remembrance here.


Gimbling in the Wabe – Beautiful, Beautiful Words

There are quite a few memorable first sentences in literature:  “Call me Ishmael.”  “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…”  “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”  Or, my personal favorite, “In a hole […]

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LitStack Review: Finders Keepers by Stephen King

Finders Keepers Stephen King Scribner Release Date:  June 2, 2015 ISBN 978-1-5011-0007-9 Finders Keepers is Stephen King’s love letter to literature.  A blood drenched, visceral, scary love letter to literature. The story centers around writer John Rothstein, who is considered by some to be one of America’s greatest authors, akin to Hemingway, Salinger, Vonnegut, Steinbeck, […]

Stephen King
Sex Criminalssex criminals
Volume 1 – One Weird Trick
Volume 2 – Two Worlds, One Cop
Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky

My recommendation is going to be a short one this week, because I’ve got beaucoup things on my plate and not even enough time to use a knife and fork. But I really wanted to give you a head’s up on a really fun couple of collections of the addictive and hilariously written comic, Sex Criminals.

Matt Fraction is possibly one of the comic industries most beloved writers. He’s an Eisner Award winner (think “the Oscars of comic books”), and his Hawkeye series for Marvel (August 2012 – July 2015) is considered one of the major industry’s best. His droll humor and ability to humanize the larger-than-life keep folks coming back time after time. Partner him up with Chip Zdarsky, and it’s a par-tay!

Let me say this upfront: Sex Criminals is not pornography. However, it is very explicit, adult humor. If you’re okay with having fun with sex, or the idea of fun sex, or the idea of sex being a vehicle for a fun story, then you’re going to enjoy Sex Criminals. If that’s not your thing, then I’ll see you next week.

In Sex Criminals, we meet Jon and Suzie. Jon works at a bank, Suzie at a library. Jon hates his job; Suzie loves hers but the library is in danger of foreclosure from the very bank that employs Jon. The two don’t know each other at the start of the series, but they find each other due to what they thought was a unique “talent” that both of them possesses: when they orgasm, time stops. Not just for a few seconds – long enough for them to wander around and marvel at things and, um, do things. So…… what does a newly infatuated couple do? They have lots of sex. And when it turns out that they need a lot of money, fast and desperate? They have a lot of sex and rob banks. Easy peasy, right? Well, yeah – until the Sex Cops show up.

Listen, the joy of Sex Criminals is not in the plot of the story, except in the broadest strokes. It’s not even in the sex, except in the fun its being the driver of the plot. The joy is in the absurdity of the storylines, the unguarded (and sometimes raunchy, sometime poignant, always genuine) dialog, and the incredible laugh-out-loud humor tickling and spanking you on every page. Even the dedications, biographies and extras (especially the extras!) are freekin’ hilarious.

So if you want to laugh and you don’t have a problem with explicit humor, check out Sex Criminals. You might be able to find individual issues, but your best bet is to pick up one of the collected volumes (Volume 1 is issues 1 – 5; Volume 2 is issues 6 – 10). And be prepared to laugh. A lot.

—Sharon Browning


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Last week, we featured a review of Scott Wilbanks’ debut novel The Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster. As part of the blog tour for this book release, we sat down with Scott to chat about his writing journey, where the idea for this book came from and his idea (and our editor’s) idea of a perfect day. Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster

Be sure to pick up your copy of The Lemoncholy Life of Annie Aster, available now!


LS: Every writer struggles on their journey to publication. What was your writer’s road like and what was the most valuable lesson you learned in the process?

Do you mind if I start with something a little off point?

LS: Sure.

Sharon’s latest Gimbling In The Wabe struck a chord with me. I’m a consummate daydreamer, so much so that I have a hard time keeping my head in “real time,” if you know what I mean. The fall out can be pretty comical. I can’t tell you how many hours I’ve wasted looking for the keys t